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Found 2 results

  1. Study links early puberty in girls to chemicals in shampoo, toothpaste and soap – even if only used by mother in pregnancy from December 22, 2018 "Chemicals known as endocrine disrupters, commonly found in hygiene products, may mimic hormones and lead children to mature well before their natural time Over the past 20 years, girls have been reaching puberty earlier, with high risks of some medical and behavioural problems Many parents already worry about the chemicals in the personal care products that their kids use but now a new study takes that fear to the next level: the exposure starts even before a child is born. Girls exposed to chemicals commonly found in shampoo, toothpaste and soap may hit puberty earlier, even if their only exposure is through the products their mothers used while they were pregnant, according to a new longitudinal study led by researchers at UC Berkeley. “We know that some of the things we put on our bodies are getting into our bodies, either because they pass through the skin or we breathe them in or we inadvertently ingest them,” said Kim Harley, lead author of the study and associate adjunct professor in the School of Public Health at Berkeley, in the UC newsletter. “We need to know how these chemicals are affecting our health.” Published in the journal Human Reproduction, this new report comes from data collected as part of the Centre for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas (CHAMACOS) study. That project followed 338 children from before birth into adolescence to reveal how early environmental exposures may impact childhood development. Over the past 20 years, research has shown that girls, and possibly also boys, have been going through puberty earlier and earlier. This is troubling news because scientists have linked the early onset of puberty with greater risk of mental illness, breast and ovarian cancer in girls and testicular cancer in boys. Early puberty, also known as precocious puberty, is defined as developing breasts and starting periods before the age of eight. The average age for girls is 11. Starting before the age of eight also causes social trouble for young girls, including a heightened tendency towards risky behaviour, explains Harley. The chemicals in question — phthalates, parabens and phenols — are known as endocrine disrupters, which may mimic hormones and lead children to mature well before their natural time. As the study noted, exposure to these chemicals is widespread, which is why it’s crucial parents be made aware of the findings. “While more research is needed, people should be aware that there are chemicals in personal care products that may be disrupting the hormones in our bodies,” Harley said, as the UC newsletter noted" https://www.scmp.com/news/world/article/2179189/study-links-early-puberty-girls-chemicals-shampoo-toothpaste-and-soap#comments https://news.berkeley.edu/2018/12/03/prenatal-exposure-to-chemicals-in-personal-care-products-may-speed-puberty-in-girls/ <more info on the study https://www.pubertytoosoon.com/puberty-signs?cid=ppc_ppd_ggl_Lupron_PEDs_DA_2018_early_puberty_in_girls_Phrase_20754011951120&gclid=CjwKCAiA99vhBRBnEiwAwpk-uAE19NK4lYh2wWOUCOSA75g8U9e4pm4oJqGSP10Nmftn_jLP2gqSoBoCmj8QAvD_BwE
  2. Colgate Total Ingredient Linked to Hormones, Cancer Spotlights FDA Process Tiffany Kary August 11, 2014 "The chemical triclosan has been linked to cancer-cell growth and disrupted development in animals. Regulators are reviewing whether it’s safe to put in soap, cutting boards and toys. Consumer companies are phasing it out. Minnesota voted in May to ban it in many products. At the same time, millions of Americans are putting it in their mouths every day, by way of a top-selling toothpaste that uses the antibacterial chemical to head off gum disease -- Colgate-Palmolive Co.’s Total. Total is safe, Colgate says, citing the rigorous Food and Drug Administration process that led to the toothpaste’s 1997 approval as an over-the-counter drug. A closer look at that application process, however, reveals that some of the scientific findings Colgate put forward to establish triclosan’s safety in toothpaste weren’t black and white -- and weren’t, until this year, available to the public. Colgate’s Total application included 35 pages summarizing toxicology studies on triclosan, which the FDA withheld from view. The agency released the pages earlier this year in response to a lawsuit over a Freedom of Information Act request. Later, following inquiries from Bloomberg News, the FDA put the pages on its website. The pages show how even with one of the U.S.’s most stringent regulatory processes -- FDA approval of a new drug -- the government relies on company-backed science to show products are safe and effective. The recently released pages, taken alongside new research on triclosan, raise questions about whether the agency did appropriate due diligence in approving Total 17 years ago, and whether its approval should stand in light of new research, said three scientists who reviewed the pages at Bloomberg News’s request." snip http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-08-11/in-35-pages-buried-at-fda-worries-over-colgate-s-total.html
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