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I spent 7 years working in a nursing home. These wonderful human beings, who have gone through a lifetime of happiness, sadness, loses, memories. So many of them do not get treated with the respect they deserve. Not by care givers or families. It is so sad that they get treated more like inanimate objects, than human beings. This should not happens. There is to much selfishness in this world.

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I spent 7 years working in a nursing home. These wonderful human beings, who have gone through a lifetime of happiness, sadness, loses, memories. So many of them do not get treated with the respect they deserve. Not by care givers or families. It is so sad that they get treated more like inanimate objects, than human beings. This should not happens. There is to much selfishness in this world.

My fiancé works at a nursing home, she's and RN, and I'm very proud of her for it... She often comes home complaining that most of the people don't get they care they deserve... To the few who don't have family who visit them, we sometimes go in and visit with them... So many stories/experiences...

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A friend sent me this the other day. Its a story from Disclose TV. While the letter may or may not be real...the message is still important.

 

 

April 20, 2014 - Two men, both seriously ill, occupied the same hospital room. One man was allowed to sit up in his bed for an hour each afternoon to help drain the fluid from his lungs. His bed was next to the room’s only window. The other man had to spend all his time flat on his back.

The men talked for hours on end. They spoke of their wives and families, their homes, their jobs, their involvement in the military service, where they had been on vacation..

Every afternoon, when the man in the bed by the window could sit up, he would pass the time by describing to his roommate all the things he could see outside the window.

The man in the other bed began to live for those one hour periods where his world would be broadened and enlivened by all the activity and colour of the world outside

 

The window overlooked a park with a lovely lake. Ducks and swans played on the water while children sailed their model boats. Young lovers walked arm in arm amidst flowers of every colour and a fine view of the city skyline could be seen in the distance.


As the man by the window described all this in exquisite details, the man on the other side of the room would close his eyes and imagine this picturesque scene.

One warm afternoon, the man by the window described a parade passing by.

Although the other man could not hear the band – he could see it in his mind’s eye as the gentleman by the window portrayed it with descriptive words.

Days, weeks and months passed. One morning, the day nurse arrived to bring water for their baths only to find the lifeless body of the man by the window, who had died peacefully in his sleep.

She was saddened and called the hospital attendants to take the body away.

As soon as it seemed appropriate, the other man asked if he could be moved next to the window. The nurse was happy to make the switch, and after making sure he was comfortable, she left him alone.

Slowly, painfully, he propped himself up on one elbow to take his first look at the real world outside. He strained to slowly turn to look out the window besides the bed.

It faced a blank wall.

The man asked the nurse what could have compelled his deceased roommate who had described such wonderful things outside this window.

The nurse responded that the man was blind and could not even see the wall.

She said, ‘Perhaps he just wanted to encourage you.’

There is tremendous happiness in making others happy, despite our own situations. Shared grief is half the sorrow, but happiness when shared, is doubled. If you want to feel rich, just count all the things you have that money can’t buy.

‘Today is a gift, that is why it is called The Present .’

 
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A power struggle collapses when you withdraw your energy 
from it. Power struggles become uninteresting to you when 
you change your intention from winning to learning about 
yourself.

- Gary Zukav

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Just made this up:

 

"Observe the things you oppose, resist or feel negative, for they are valuable teachers
through polarity and causality of things."

 

:)

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Men fight for liberty and win it with hard knocks. Their children, brought up easy, let it slip away again, poor fools. And their grandchildren are once more slaves.

- D.H. Lawrence

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5 Minutes A Day Can Change Your Life

June 17, 2014

John Kalinowski & Jami Patterson

 

 

We were all raised in a world where we tend to place a huge amount of importance on what other people think of us.

"Many of us are concerned with “keeping up with the Jones’”—or maybe now it’s the Kardashians. Whether these people are actually neighbors at the end of your suburban cul-de-sac, close friends or total strangers, we live in a culture obsessed with acquiring stuff and building status to be more important in the eyes of others, and none of it actually makes anybody “happy.”

For me, it’s so deeply programmed in my psyche that I don’t even realize I’m chasing after the Jones’ until I’m running so fast that I fall on my face.

It’s then that I ask if this is just another thing outside of myself that I am hoping will fill me up and “make” me happy?

More money, an impressive career, a hot body, a beach house… do any of these things actually help me learn how to be happy on a day-to-day basis? Nope. Happiness only stems from learning to love myself and others on a deeper level. But, I can’t always see that.

Each day I have to practice detaching from my thoughts, so that I can see more clearly. My most important tool is meditation.

Six years ago I began by taking just five minutes every morning to close my eyes and focus on my breath. When a thought passes through my head, I just keep coming back to the rhythm of my breathing. This practice helps me to listen to myself on a deeper level, which is where the real answers are, and the way in which I continue to gain a firmer grasp on what happiness really means.

Somewhere deep inside, we each know the answers. Happiness is nothing you can acquire, it comes from unearthing the calm peaceful loving core that exists in each one of us, and using it to navigate all of the challenges we face. It’s one challenge at a time, one day at a time.

But, the more we practice even just five minutes per day, the easier it becomes."

Have a beautiful week!

John (& Jami)

http://www.elephantjournal.com/2014/06/5-minutes-a-day-can-change-your-life-john-kalinowski-jami-patterson/

 

 
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