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breezy

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Considering all the train derailments in the last few months, I found this article interesting

 

Official: Bomb found on Madison County railroad track would not have derailed train

By ELIZABETH DONALD

January 21, 2014

 

 

"EDWARDSVILLE — An live explosive device was found on railroad tracks near Illinois 140 Monday, but officials believe it would not have been strong enough to derail a train.

 

Norfolk Southern Railroad employees called the Madison County Sheriff's Department about 11:30 a.m. Monday to look at a device made from a small propane tank and left on the train tracks near Quercus Grove Road in rural Madison County.

 

The sheriff's department then called in the Illinois Secretary of State Police's bomb disposal unit, which determined that the device was functional. The two-man bomb squad team used a counter charge to render the device safe. "That concluded the bomb squad's role in this process," said spokesman Henry Haupt.

 

The device was then turned over to the Norfolk Southern Railroad Police for investigation, Haupt said. Norfolk Southern spokesman Robin Chapman said the device probably would not have done a lot of damage.

 

"It was a 1.2-pound propane tank, the kind you attach to a portable grill, and it had a couple of flares taped to it," Chapman said. "Apparently whoever had placed it there had attempted to light it by igniting the flares, but was unable to do so."

snip

 

http://www.bnd.com/2014/01/21/3015341/police-investigating-apparent.html

 


 
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Accidents Surge as Oil Industry Takes the Train

January 25, 2014

By CLIFFORD KRAUSS and JAD MOUAWAD

 

"CASSELTON, N.D. — Kerry’s Kitchen is where Casselton residents gather for gossip and comfort food, especially the caramel rolls baked fresh every morning. But a fiery rail accident last month only a half mile down the tracks, which prompted residents to evacuate the town, has shattered this calm, along with people’s confidence in the crude-oil convoys that rumble past Kerry’s seven times a day.

 

What was first seen as a stopgap measure in the absence of pipelines has become a fixture in the nation’s energy landscape — about 200 “virtual pipelines” that snake in endless processions across the horizon daily. It can take more than five minutes for a single oil train, made up of about 100 tank cars, to pass by Kerry’s, giving this bedroom community 20 miles west of Fargo a front-row seat to the growing practice of using trains to carry oil.

 

 

“I feel a little on edge — actually very edgy — every time one of those trains passes,” said Kerry Radermacher, who owns the coffee shop. “Most people think we should slow the production, and the trains, down.”

 

0126-biz-RAIL-720.png

snip

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/26/business/energy-environment/accidents-surge-as-oil-industry-takes-the-train.html?_r=3

 Tx Reddwolf

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We seem to have a real problem on a cruise liner.

 

Vomiting bug now affecting 600 on Caribbean cruise ship

Illness is believed to be norovirus, a highly contagious virus that is spread by touching an infected surface

January 28, 2014

 

 

"Reuters The number of passengers and crew who fell ill aboard a Royal Caribbean cruise ship has climbed to more than 600, many vomiting and using biohazard bags for anything they touch.

 

The updated sick count aboard the Explorer of the Seas, which cut short its Caribbean cruise and was expected to dock in New Jersey on Wednesday, is more than double the 300 originally thought to have been felled by gastrointestinal illness, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

 

Among those sick with vomiting and diarrhea were some of the onboard entertainers, which caused shows to be cancelled, passengers said.

 

"I started with upset stomach and vomiting, and that lasted all night and into the morning," passenger Joseph Angelillo told CNN in a telephone interview.

 

Another ill passenger, Arnee Dodd of Connecticut, wrote on Twitter: "I've been sick and quarantined... Everything I touch goes in a biohazard bag."

snip

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/usa/10600897/Vomiting-bug-now-affecting-600-on-Caribbean-cruise-ship.html

 

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I'll just stay away from all crowds of people,the amount of people I see use the loo and NOT wash their hands is unbelievable!

 

And those cooking shows and what not on telly-- bare hands swishing and scooping around in your food, and then your supposed to eat it-Eeewww.

 

I used to work in the hospitality trade years ago, and the things I saw done in kitchens made me thing 3 times about eating out, actually, I don't eat out anymore.

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Mississippi town evacuated after train derailment spills flammable chemicals

January 31, 2014

 

"Dozens of families were forced from their southeastern Mississippi homes Friday after a train derailed, tipping over cars carrying fuel oil and methanol and causing officials to grow concerned about another potentially deadly chemical spill.

 

The Mississippi Department of Motor Vehicles announced that the train, which was traveling from Jackson, Miss. To Mobile, Ala., ran off the tracks at 9 A.M. local time (10 A.M. EST) and that no one was hurt in the incident outside New Augusta.

 

The approximately 50 people living within a half-mile radius of the accident were evacuated, though, because the train was hauling an ethanol-based product that spilled. Surrounding highways were also shutdown as a precaution because of ethanol's high flammability. Between 3,000 and 4,000 gallons were spilled, according to local estimates."

snip

http://rt.com/usa/mississippi-train-derailment-chemicals-496/?utm_source=browser&utm_medium=aplication_chrome&utm_campaign=chrome

tx Icanseeatoms

 

carrying FUEL OIL and METHANOL

 

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Two derailments blamed on cold, but experts say trains safe

This happened in Wisconsin last week

 

"Two freight trains ran off the tracks in Wisconsin last week, and in each case, extreme cold was cited as a possible cause — from a switch malfunction to cracks in the track itself.

With more extreme cold on its way to Wisconsin this week, should Amtrak passengers worry about their trains succumbing to weather-related derailments, too?

Officials say no.

While there's always some risk of accidents due to extreme weather, Jeff Plale, Wisconsin's rail commissioner, said there's little cause for concern with passenger trains.

He added that there are few freight derailments as well.

"The rail companies are very vigilant about getting out and inspecting tracks," he said in an interview last week.

"It's still a very, very safe mode of transportation, and 99.97% of all shipments arrive without incident."

Passenger trains are less risky because they're lighter and shorter than freight trains, and their loads don't shift, he said."

snip

http://www.jsonline.com/news/wisconsin/with-2-derailments-blamed-on-cold-experts-say-train-travel-still-safe-b99190454z1-242095721.html

 

Yes the cold is a factor, both for the ground, and for the rails themselves, as cold affects the steel.

 

 

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17 rail cars derail in Sedalia; No injuries reported

February 6, 2014

 

Highway 67 closed by derailment

 

Sedalia_Derailment_1391722757746_2375682

After several freight cars derailed, a set wheels and an axle came to rest precariously close to the gas pump at the Jarre Mart grocery store in Sedalia on Feb. 6, 2014    Photo by Pat Norwood

 

"SEDALIA, Colo. - Seventeen BNSF Railway cars derailed in Sedalia on Thursday afternoon.

 

The empty rail cars derailed about 1:30 p.m. at Highway 67 and U.S. 85 in Sedalia, said Douglas County Sheriff's spokesman Sgt. Ron Hanavan. There are no reports of injuries or hazardous material spills and the derailed car remained upright, he added.

 

AIRTRACKER7's camera showed box cars and tank cars derailed. Underneath, the tracks and railroad ties were badly damaged.

"We will work through the evening the get our cars back on the track and moved out, we will inspect the track, make whatever repairs needed and continue operations on the track," said BNSF spokesman Andy Williams, who added that the train had a total of 35 cars.

 

During the derailment, a pair of wheels and their axle came off a box car and rolled across Highway 67, knocking out one of the pillars by the Jarre Mart grocery store and just missing the gas pump, said Pat Norwood, an employee at Bud's Bar who is also a volunteer firefighter for the West Douglas County Fire Protection District."

snip

http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/local-news/14-rail-cars-derail-in-sedalia-no-injuries-reported02062014

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I've been meaning to mention this little bit of info on this thread ,,years ago quite a few of my friends worked on the rail ,they were laying fibre optic caple under ground beside the rail all across Canada equipment on ,,then equipment off the rail for trains scheduled to pass ,they did this for years ,,the one thing they all agreed on was they would never travel by train anywhere ,,they implied the whole mode of travel was an accident waiting to happen ,it was a long time ago so I didn't really inquire about the details

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Military flight diverted to Chicopee after pressurization loss
by Liam Martin

February 8, 2014

 

"CHICOPEE, Mass. —A military aircraft headed to Delaware from Germany was diverted to Chicopee, Mass., Saturday after it experienced a loss of pressurization above the Atlantic Ocean, officials said.

 

"Most people were sleeping, and then we just heard this noise, and people jumped up," said a passenger who asked not to be identified.

 

The Air Force Galaxy C-5 was carrying 25 crew and passengers when it lost pressurization at 34,000 feet at about 11 a.m., according to a statement from Westover Air Reserve Base in Chicopee.

 

"All the oxygen masks were coming out of the ceiling," the passenger said. "I think everybody was just scared for a while."

westover-flight-4-020814-jpg.jpg
The plane landed safely and only one little girl was taken to the hospital

snip

http://www.wcvb.com/news/local/boston-north/hanscom-crews-staging-for-plane-with-inflight-issue/-/11984708/24366732/-/qc8vvrz/-/index.html

 

 

 

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Two dead and nine injured as train derails in France

 

Posted Sun 9 Feb 2014, 12:14am AEDT

 

 

Two people died and nine others were injured when a train derailed in the southern French Alps, firefighters said.

 

The train was travelling from the coastal city of Nice to the town of Digne-les-Bains and came off the tracks after hitting a rock on the rails, they said.

 

Emergency services rushed to the scene and a red alert, meaning "several victims", was issued. Firefighters from around the region were drafted in to help.

 

A total of 110 firefighters and 32 vehicles were deployed, as well as two helicopters.

 

One of the injured is in critical condition and eight others, including the driver, sustained lighter injuries, the fire service said.

 

There were a total of 34 people on board at the time of the accident.

 

Authorities encountered difficulties in reaching the accident due to heavy snow and an isolated location.

 

In July, seven people were killed when a commuter train derailed near Paris.

 

 

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-02-09/train-derails-in-france-killing-two/5247772

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17 rail cars derail in Sedalia; No injuries reported

February 6, 2014

 

Highway 67 closed by derailment

 

Sedalia_Derailment_1391722757746_2375682

After several freight cars derailed, a set wheels and an axle came to rest precariously close to the gas pump at the Jarre Mart grocery store in Sedalia on Feb. 6, 2014    Photo by Pat Norwood

 

 

 

 

There are those darn axles that trouble me so much about these train accidents, breezy.

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Penn. train derailment leaks thousands of gallons of oil, sends car into building

Published time: February 13, 2014 23:00

 

post-2154-0-37772500-1392346127_thumb.pn  post-2154-0-50389400-1392346197_thumb.pn
 

 

A 120-car train making its way across Pennsylvania derailed Thursday morning, spilling thousands of gallons of oil and alarming observers who have called for stricter safety standards on trains hauling hazardous material.

 

The train is owned by the New Jersey-based Norfolk Southern Corp -- company officials told Reuters that 21 tank cars went off the tracks at a turn near the Kiskiminetas River in Vandergrift, a small town in western Pennsylvania.

 

Nineteen of the cars contained crude oil while the other two held liquefied petroleum gas. Three of the 19 cars spilled as a result of the crash. Company officials maintained that the leaks were plugged but refused to say how many gallons of oil had spilled. Sources told the local WTAE-TV that an estimated 3,000 to 4,000 gallons had escaped the tanks.

 

“It's contained,” said Norfolk Southern spokesman Dan Stevens. “The hazmat crews for the railroad are on site and will be taking care of that situation.”

 

No one was injured in the accident. The Department of Environmental Protection sent a 3-member emergency response team to aid in the clean-up.

 

“It did not get into any streams or creeks,” said DEP spokesman John Poister.

 

Residents said the derailment was tremendous enough to shake buildings and could be heard throughout the surrounding area. One of the loose cars slammed into a business, destroying equipment that is used to mill steel blocks.

 

“I heard a strange noise, a hollow, screeching sound,” witness Ray Cochran, whose home oversees the railroad tracks, told Reuters. “I looked out the window and saw three or four tankers turn over and one of them ran into the building.”

 

 

 

Researchers found that, in the years spanning 1975 to 2010, 800,000 gallons of oil spilled from railroad tankers. Yet 2013 alone saw over 1.15 million gallons of crude oil leak from trains and into the environment. What has caused the surge in accidents is unknown, yet activists and lawmakers alike have called for change in order to stop such events before an entire town is devastated.

 

http://rt.com/usa/derailment-thousands-oil-car-building-941/

 


 

Maybe if they attach the axles better, the cars will fare better. Those axles are still giving me problems.

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I can't help thinking that someone or something wants to spread that Augie or contaminated alien oil around that BlueET has said his Blue friends have been trying to neutralize so it can affect more people.

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10:26PM, FRI 14 FEB 2014

CRUISE PASSENGER DIES AFTER 'FREAK WAVE' HITS SHIP
Cruise ship passenger dies after freak wave

 

 

A cruise ship passenger has died after their 22,000-tonne vessel was hit by a freak wave in the English Channel today.

 

The wave battered the British cruise ship Marco Polo, operated by Cruise & Maritime Voyages, as it headed for its home port of Tilbury in Essex at the end of a 42-night voyage.

 

Water crashed through a window injuring a number of the 735 passengers, who were mainly British.

 

An 85-year-old male passenger and a woman passenger in her 70s were airlifted off the ship. The male passenger later died.

 

http://www.itv.com/news/update/2014-02-14/cruise-ship-passenger-dies-after-freak-wave/

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Fracking Oil: Like Normal Oil, But Just A Bit More Highly Explosive?

 

Officials say chemicals from the fracking process may have led to last month's deadly train explosion that vaporized dozens of Québecois.

 

When a train carrying 72 cars of North Dakota oil derailed in Quebec July 6, killing 47 people and destroying a small community, the attention focussed on what went wrong on the rails. Yet a new railway-sponsored investigation is indicating the concern should have been directed at the substances found inside the oil tankers.

 

071013_QuebecTrain_16x9-690x389.jpg

 

http://www.mintpressnews.com/hazmat-fracking-chemicals-lac-megantic-train-explosion/167007/

 

RW, all,

 

Here are some thoughts and links shared with me today. 

 

For your consideration:

 

 

Remember this Chani reference?

 
"oil gets very big sicknes no use anymore after 15 may"
 
Well, I just found a possible link between the explosive train wrecks and a possible "oil sickness".  This condition of oil, linked to fracking,  makes the it more volatile, more prone to explosion,  Specifically, for the time being, Bakken Shale Crude is being pointed out,  and they are saying the culprit is phosphates entering the oil from specific fracking liquids.  I'm not sure they have it figured out yet, but phosphates are oxydizing agents.   Fuel + Oxygen = Potential Bomb.  Fuel + Oxygen +  Ignition = Explosion.  The stuff appears to be unsafe to ship by rail.  I am wondering if the stuff is even safe to ship through pipelines?
 
Here are some links:
 
 
 
 
I am reminded, too, about the explosion at the Deepwater Horizon well in the Gulf of Mexico.  There have been other explosions down there, but that was the biggest and worst so far.  Also a lot of refinery explosions lately.   Perhaps the problem is not just with bakken crude, perhaps it is a problem with any deep oil accessed with the fracking technique?  What if fracking is suddenly not acceptable due to risk of explosion?
  It is interesting, and maybe a Chani hit if they don't figure out a way to eliminate the problem.   Maybe it is a stretch to call it "sickness",  and maybe not.  For now I am not sure they have identified the problem.  What if it turns out to be a bacterial, found in the deep earth, that is creating the oxygen?  Somehow a Chani hit doesn't sound like such a good thing.
 
I know there have been a lot of crude oil explosions over the last few years.  I guess I will have to watch that closer.  Oil has always been a fuel, but only when it mixes with oxygen can if burn.  If it comes mixed with oxygen from the start, it could be a real serious problem.
 
What if the earthquakes around fracking areas are actually underground explosions?  Hmmm.  Lots of possibilities.
 
 
I bumped into this today:
(?? sickness from oil ??)
 
 
 
And this, please watch:
 
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Keystone PipeLIES Exposed: The Facts on Sticky Leaks, Billion Dollar Spills, and Dirty Air

http://rinf.com/alt-news/breaking-news/keystone-pipelies-exposed-facts-sticky-leaks-billion-dollar-spills-dirty-air/

 

Excerpt:

 

How Tar Sands Work

Tar sands oil bears little resemblance to anything most people would recognize as petroleum. In its natural form, it is not even liquid. Rather, it is solid or semi-solid bitumen, mixed with clay, sand, and water in a sticky sludge.

 

“It basically is a very tarry, asphalt-like substance that requires an enormous amount of energy to get out of the ground and an enormous amount of energy to move and to refine,” says Anthony Swift, staff attorney with the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC). “It’s a much lower grade of oil, almost liquid coal. There are many more impurities there are many more toxic substances in it” compared to conventional petroleum.

Tar sands extraction is generally done in two ways: surface mining and drilling.

 

Surface mining is similar to the commonly understood form of mineral extraction. Much like a gold mine or coal mine requires digging into the earth to uncover the valuable minerals held within, tar sands mining differs only in the vast areas that must be cleared and the vast amounts of earth that must be dug up to remove the bitumen.

 

Drilling for tar sands, however, is very different from any other form of oil drilling. Rather than poking a giant straw into an underground reservoir that then gushes up under pressure or is pumped to the surface, the bitumen locked in the soil is too thick to be pumped in a similar fashion.

Drilling for bitumen, typically undertaken when the tar sands are too deep beneath the surface for cost-effective mining, requires a multi-step process. First, a collection tube is drilled. And then above that an injection tube is drilled, which then forces superheated steam into the earth under extreme pressure, which heats and liquefies the bitumen which is been collected by the first tube.

 

Each process has its own significant drawbacks. Most obviously, surface mining requires a level of industrial activity on a delicate ecosystem that many people likely would find unconscionable.

 

“It’s called the boreal forest. This is an incredibly rich ecosystem with the largest remaining intact ecosystem in North America and the tar sands would completely devastate that region,” says Kate Colarulli, associate director of the Sierra Club’s Beyond Oil campaign. “It would pollute some of the largest freshwater rivers in North AmericaThe Athabasca [River] is facing tremendous pollution from this, and it would create huge amounts of toxic air emissions. So what we see at the production site is an environmental Armageddon.”

 

“In the tar sands, they’re not finding these pools of oil waiting to be discovered. They’re getting up dirt that has a little bit of oil in it,” says 350.org policy director Jason Kowalski. “They’re clear-cutting the land. They’re digging up the dirt and they take away the eight parts sand for the one part of oil within that. That process is incredibly energy intensive. You end up having twice as many carbon emissions as you would from burning the oil just by making the oil. It looks like Mordor.”

 

At first glance, drilling seems like a far less disruptive. Rather than digging an enormous pit stretching for miles, the drilling process is comparatively low-impact, requiring less of a footprint as much of the work of separating the bitumen from the sand happens underground. But its impacts are much more than meets the eye.

Leaks and Seeps

Take for instance the Cold Lake, Alberta, oil leak, in which a steady flow of oil seeped up from the ground, leaving pools of oil on the surface, contaminating and killing plants and animals for several weeks after being discovered in May 2013. The company responsible for the site claims that the leak was caused by the failure of a well casing installed by a prior owner of the well after a similar spill in 2009. Despite the company’s claims that the spill is secured and that clean up activities are “well underway,” provincial regulators flatly announced in July, “There is no control on this incident.”

As yet, there is no plan to stop the spill, because according to one government scientist,nobody knows how to stop it. It may simply continue to flow until the oil runs out.

 

Perhaps more troubling than the oil that seeps to the surface is the oil that migrates underground. Leaders of the Cold Lake First Nations (as aboriginal Indian tribes are known in Canada) have expressed concern that oil could contaminate underground aquifers. ““It’s not so much the surface spill, that can be cleaned up. But you can’t control what happens underground, that’s a different story,” Cold Lake First Nations councillor Walter Janvier toldThe Edmonton Journal. Janvier says Cold Lakes First Nations wants a moratorium on the steam-injection method until a full technical assessment as to its safety is conducted.

After the bitumen is taken from the ground, it must be processed into synthetic crude before it can be transported to a refinery. The first step is heating the bitumen/clay/sand mixture so the solid matter separates from the oil. The tar sand is mixed with hot water, and is then agitated, causing the bitumen to rise to the top, where it is skimmed and further processed to remove all remaining contaminant particles. The water is then sent to a tailings pond, where the particulate matter sinks to the bottom, and the water at the top is removed and reused.

Massive Tailing “Ponds,” Lakes of Poisoned Water

While it appears to be a simple matter of lather-rinse-repeat, the sheer volume of water required by the process makes it environmentally problematic. Though the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers asserts the totality tailing ponds in tar sands covers just67 square miles, the Sierra Club’s Colarulli counters that they are large enough to be seen from space.

 

Others who have witnessed the tailing ponds firsthand say that they are anything but a pleasant experience.

 

“I went up to Fort McMurray [Alberta, where tar sands production is centered] in 2007 and saw firsthand the tar sands facilities. I got to tour of one of the largest ones, Suncor, not from management but from the union representing the workers at the facility,” says Slocum. “We went to the edge of one of the large retaining ponds for the tailings waste. The area that I was standing at extended beyond the horizon. It’s like standing on the edge of the ocean, except this was not an ocean, this was a contaminated body of water that was the legacy of a generation of tar sands production at just one facility.”

In addition to being extremely large, the tailing ponds are also extremely difficult to manage. Alberta’s Energy Resources Conservation Board has called out tar sands producers for failing to meet goals to reduce the proliferation of tailings ponds. The total of tailing pond capacity in Alberta is presently 925 million cubic meters, up from 725 million cubic meters four years ago.

 

 

 

Not a Drink: “Pet Coke” and the Kochs

Petroleum coke, or pet coke, is a byproduct of the refining process. As a cheap substitute for coal, it can be used to fuel power plants. But with tar sands’ higher contaminant content, and the fact that more than 6 million tons of it are produced annually, pet coke is anotherenvironmental catastrophe waiting to happen.

 

The catastrophe occurs not only when the pet coke is burned, spewing massive amounts of carbon, sulfur, and other pollutants, but as we’ve seen in Detroit, when it is stored and stockpiled.

 

“Our Windsor neighbors, some folk started calling me. And the media called the same day,” recalls Rashid Tlaib, the Michigan State Representative who represents the Detroit neighborhoods that abut the Detroit River and border the Canadian city of Windsor, Ontario. “They are asking me, ‘What’s with these black piles?’ I said, ‘What black piles?’ At that time those piles were about 15 feet tall; now [in July 2013] they’re all over 45 feet.”

Those black piles were petroleum coke, and from the time they first appeared shortly after the nearby Marathon Petroleum oil refinery began processing about 28,000 barrels of tar sands oil daily in November 2012, they eventually comprised a mound three stories tall and stretching for an entire city block. Shockingly, the pile was almost entirely uncontrolled, i.e., little if anything was done to control for wind and water runoff. In fact, the company that stockpiled the pet coke never even got permits to store it.

 

“They never applied for any processes, nothing,” says Tlaib. “There’s a fire permit they ended up having to do, and they did that. But other than that they [had] no permits.

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Train Derails, Climbs Escalator at Chicago Airport

March 24, 2014

By PRIYA SRIDHAR and CARLA K. JOHNSON Associated Press

 

 

post-5-0-07582600-1395698992_thumb.jpg

 

photo from katu.com

 

"The president of a Chicago transit union said Monday there are indications that the operator dozed off before the train jumped the tracks and scaled an escalator at one of nation's busiest airports, injuring 32 people.

 

The operator told Amalgamated Transit Union Local 308 President Robert Kelly that she had worked a lot of overtime recently and was "extremely tired" at the time of the derailment, he said at a news conference.

 

The derailment happened just before 3 a.m. Monday at the end of the Chicago Transit Authority's Blue Line at O'Hare International Airport. No one suffered life-threatening injuries.

 

Earlier, National Transportation Safety Board official Tim DePaepe said investigators had not drawn any conclusions about the cause of the accident, but were looking into whether faulty brakes, signals or human error were factors.

 

The operator, who was still hospitalized, will be interviewed, DePaepe said, and investigators would examine her routine over the last few days.

 

The timing of the accident helped avoid an enormous disaster, as the underground Blue Line station is usually packed with travelers coming to and from Chicago."

snip

http://abcnews.go.com/Travel/wireStory/train-derails-climbs-escalator-chicago-airport-23036836

 

 

 

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Jet Engine Explodes at Airport: 4 Injured

 

Four people were injured after a plane's engine reportedly "exploded" at the start of a Swiss Air flight out of London City Airport.

They suffered minor injuries in what airline officials called a "technical issue".

All the passengers on Swiss International Airlines Flight LX437 from London City to Geneva had to flee the plane in an emergency evacuation.

A picture of the plane taken immediately after the alert showed passengers running from the aircraft which was stationary on a runway with its emergency chutes inflated. 

The plane was carrying 74 passengers and four crew on board at the time, a spokeswoman said.

Mike Mompi, 28, who was flying to Switzerland for a ski holiday, said the Avro RJ100 was revving up on the runway for take-off when the engine "exploded".

 

http://news.sky.com/...rport-four-hurt

 

http://www.dailymail...cks-runway.html

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TRAFFIC ALERT: Train derailment at Doniphan and Talbot

April 7, 2014

Andra Litton

 

doniphanfire.jpg

Courtesy Tx DOT     (ElPaso)

 

"El Paso, TX (KTSM) — El Paso Fire Department is currently on the scene of a train derailment at the intersection of Doniphan and Talbot, along with a neighboring, serious condition four, three-alarm fire. At the height of the fire, flames could be seen for miles.

 

Doniphan is currently closed from Spur 16 to Vinton St. and TxDot is assisting with the street closure. Crews say that motorists should expect for the street to be closed anywhere from 4 to 6 hours, reopening no later than 9:30 p.m.

A witness at the scene reported to our crews that firefighters began going door-to-door asking residents and business owners to evacuate.

 

A representative with Burlington Northern Santa Fe has confirmed that the train involved was a BNSF lead locomotive that derailed at approximately 12:50 p.m. Two engines derailed along with one railcar. The representative with BNSF states that there have been no injuries and no spill hazard is involved.

 

Representatives from the El Paso Fire Department says that it appears that the BNSF train was switching tracks at the time of derailment, when the track broke and the two engines along with the single railcar came off the tracks. They remain upright at the scene and EPFD confirmed that no hazardous chemicals were involved, and believe that the rail cars were transporting sugar at the time of derailment."

snip

http://www.ktsm.com/news/traffic-alert-train-derailment-talbot-and-i-10-tanker-fire

Tx Reddwolf

 

 

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Another cruise ship with spreading illness. Ok now. Cruise ships have been around since the late 1800. Sanitation and immunization was not as stringent in those days. So why, now, are we having all this illness? Hhhmmm. Is someone trying to keep us off our oceans? To scare people away from these cruise ships for some reason? I am beginning to wonder.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/04/12/travel/cruise-ships-sickness/index.html

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