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Psychosisss

It's an awesome world

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A little frog in Puerto Rico, that sounds like a bird chirping. Thanks rab, I choose to post both videos, because the first one shows the little guy responsible, and the second one just records the amazing sound.
 
El coquí de Puerto Rico 
 




Nighttime Sounds Of Puerto Rican Coquí ( Co-Key) Frog


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How Animals See the World

Source: http://nautil.us/issue/11/light/how-animals-see-the-world

http://karapaia.livedoor.biz/archives/52157469.html?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=facebook

Cat's vision                                                            Human vision

48ee2d75.jpg

 

Bee's vision                                                           Human vision

be507556.jpg

Bee photography © Dr Schmitt, Weinheim, Germany

 

A bit more of images at the link...

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G'day

 

I am a tree huger, and feel that the bigger the better...

3,200 Year Old Tree Is So Massive It’s Never Been Captured In A Single Image. Until Now.

 

 

article-0-1BD5E0FE00000578-570_634x1614.

 

It is actually a mosaic composed Of 126 images

More at...

http://distractify.com/geek/science/after-126-separate-photos-scientists-have-captured-this-incredibly-tall-tree-in-a-single-image/

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G'day

 

I am a tree huger, and feel that the bigger the better...

3,200 Year Old Tree Is So Massive It’s Never Been Captured In A Single Image. Until Now.

 

 

article-0-1BD5E0FE00000578-570_634x1614.

 

It is actually a mosaic composed Of 126 images

More at...

http://distractify.com/geek/science/after-126-separate-photos-scientists-have-captured-this-incredibly-tall-tree-in-a-single-image/

 

 

Tree girl here.

 

You've just sealed the vacation plans for this year! 

 

I have a pic of my mother and sis, taken sometime in the 40's, at the base of a Sequoia, with 5 or 6 cars parked at it's base.  I've always wanted to find that tree. 

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Tree girl here.

 

You've just sealed the vacation plans for this year! 

 

I have a pic of my mother and sis, taken sometime in the 40's, at the base of a Sequoia, with 5 or 6 cars parked at it's base.  I've always wanted to find that tree. 

 

It is really cool when I can have a positive influence on other peoples life.

Thanks for the heads up on your intent.

I am envious!

Please give a good hug from me.

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It is really cool when I can have a positive influence on other peoples life.

Thanks for the heads up on your intent.

I am envious!

Please give a good hug from me.

 

I thank you

 

and will totally hug it out with the tree.. 

 

:) 

 

I have moved so many many times in life..

 

and naturally found myself living in the city of trees. 

 

Bliss of colors, rich with eagles, and birds of prey, and once full of the plump fish of great grandfathers great grandfathers journals. 

 

We protect them, best as can.

 

But there is that one tree...  and that pic has done me in.  I gotta find it... just laying a hand on it, to know, wherever you go, you've touched a grand living source.  

 

Goosebumps.

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Treehugger here too!

 

I saw this tree a few years ago and almost wept, such beautiful energy. In fact the whole of Cairns is beyond beautiful

 

http://www.virtualtourist.com/travel/Australia_and_Oceania/Australia/State_of_Queensland/Cairns-1878548/Things_To_Do-Cairns-The_Fig_Tree-BR-1.html

 

That looks awesome!!! 

 

I want to see that too!

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Decoding the Dolphin :)


Software has performed the first real-time translation of a dolphin whistle – and better data tools are giving fresh insights into primate communication too


IT was late August 2013 and Denise Herzing was swimming in the Caribbean. The dolphin pod she had been tracking for the past 25 years was playing around her boat. Suddenly, she heard one of them say, "Sargassum".


"I was like whoa! We have a match. I was stunned," says Herzing, who is the director of the Wild Dolphin Project. She was wearing a prototype dolphin translator called Cetacean Hearing and Telemetry (CHAT) and it had justtranslated a live dolphin whistle for the first time.


It detected a whistle for sargassum, or seaweed, which she and her team had invented to use when playing with the dolphin pod. They hoped the dolphins would adopt the whistles, which are easy to distinguish from their own natural whistles – and they were not disappointed. When the computer picked up the sargassum whistle, Herzing heard her own recorded voice saying the word into her ear.


As well as boosting our understanding of animal behaviour, the moment hints at the potential for using algorithms to analyse any activity where information is transmitted – including our daily activities (see "Scripts for life").


"It sounds like a fabulous observation, one you almost have to resist speculating on. It's provocative," says Michael Coen, a biostatistician at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.


Herzing is quick to acknowledge potential problems with the sargassum whistle. It is just one instance and so far hasn't been repeated. Its audio profile looks different from the whistle they taught the dolphins – it has the same shape but came in at a higher frequency. Brenda McCowan of the University of California, Davis, says her experience with dolphin vocalisations matches that observation.


Thad Starner at the Georgia Institute of Technology and technical lead on the wearable computer Google Glass, built CHAT for Herzing with a team of graduate students. Starner and Herzing are using pattern-discovery algorithms, designed to analyse dolphin whistles and extract meaningful features that a person might miss or not think to look for. As well as listening out for invented whistles, the team hopes to start trying to figure out what the dolphins' natural communication means, too.


McCowan says it's an exciting time for the whole field of animal communication. With better information-processing tools, researchers can analyse huge data sets of animal behaviour for patterns


http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22129624.300-dolphin-whistle-instantly-translated-by-computer.html#.UzSKb1yAzdK


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Thats awesome- its like some jeweller has made them up and electro plated them with gold and platinum ???

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