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I doubt that everyone would be high everyday. I doubt that the majority of people would. I do think that the people who already manage to illegally use the drugs will do so. That would be no different. But, maybe the state could get in on the action (legally) and use business drug taxes to fund more social projects for the state  to help people who feel the need to abuse drugs (not that I put stock in that happening). 

I also think the judge is wrong that there is a difference between Brazil and Europe and US in that the drug traffickers do have a negative impact on the poor communities all over. That's where most of the violence and murders over drug operations occur. 

I imagine that if drug dealers could go legitimate (though, admittedly, some would find some other illegal activities because that is a draw for them), economies could benefit, with the right regulations in place. Most criminals who run successful operations are actually smart -- some of them brilliant. 

In any case, the "fight" against drugs is not working. But I also tend to think that the state has it's hand fully in that pot (no pun intended).

 

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Never underestimate the power of addiction - especially legal addiction.  It wouldn't have to be everybody, all day everyday, but I seriously doubt that I would like a Dr trying to make a diagnosis on my child whilst they were high.  Some Dr's already use prescription drugs to keep going so what's to stop them using a legal substance.  What about the pilot that's flying your plane.  If drugs are legal then how could the employer airline stop them using?

Life is a struggle for many and a legal way to numb themselves from the stress and strains of life would be very tempting to many. 

 

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I would say they can treat it the same way as alcohol, which is every bit as dangerous and harmful as the arbitrarily assigned illegal drugs. Alcohol is legal. So, no drinking on the job. No drugging on the job. The laws making drugs illegal do not stop people from acquiring and using them. 

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No that cannot be done properly with marijuana kande.  Readings for alcohol show up during and immediately after use, alcohol levels go up for 2 hours and then down for 2 hours so after 4 hours+ the test will read zero as the alcohol is out of the system.  MJ can stay in the system for up to 10 days and will give a positive test reading during that time so it is a little different to ascertain when the person last used the substance.

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Yes, it can. A company sets rules -- no drinking, no drugs. They set the parameters for testing. You test positive, you're out. People can take it upon themselves to accept some personal responsibility for their actions and accept the consequences of the same.

I'm just saying the law is not what makes the difference. People either take drugs or not, legally or illegally. If the laws actually stopped people from doing it, they wouldn't be giving people drug tests right now as it is. Under current drug testing, folks are not supposed to have it in their system. How would making drugs legal change that? If you are not supposed to take drugs in order to perform a certain function, that would be true whether it is legal to take drugs or not.

The threat of prison and imprisonment has not shown to be a suitable deterrent with respect to drug use. 

I believe that it is not drug use that is the problem. It is the abuse of drugs. Imprisonment does not rehabilitate habitual drug abusers. Additionally, there is the problem of the enterprise of illegal drugs. This is a vast global societal problem.

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I agree with many of your comments kande.  So the bottom line in your argument is that MJ can be legal but people must choose to voluntarily not use it because it is a condition of their employment and it shows up in the urine test for 10 days so they cannot use it over the weekend for example as they would not pass the test Monday.

This exact situation happened in the mines here about 15 years ago.  A lot of guys in mining were using mull only on the their days off but then they bought in compulsory testing so they couldn't use it anymore and keep their jobs.  Their solution - change to Meth Amphetamine because that could be used on the days off and was out of the system for testing within 24 hours. As you can imagine using Meth didn't work out so well for many of them and created drug habits that resulted in them losing their jobs anyway.

Are you suggesting that every single Dr, nurse, teacher, Police Officer, Pilot, child care worker (and the list goes on) gets random drug tests ongoing?  Just the cost (let alone the time and effort) of those tests alone would be astronomical. Mines make billions a year and they still complain about the costs of testing, both breath for alcohol and urine for drugs.

The vast majority of middle income employers or small to medium business would not test for these reasons and therefore we are back to my original argument.

At the end of the day that is exactly like it is now.  People who choose to use serious drugs gets jobs where testing is not done or stay unemployed and often resort to crime to pay for their habits.

30 years ago the whole West Australian Police Force was surveyed in writing by the Govt for their opinion of whether marijuana should be legalised.  We debated it at length between ourselves for days and there were very few Police Officers that considered experimentation or even ongoing use of mull was a problem for us or the community. Users were docile, did not create social problems and many could grow their own so they didn't need to resort to crime to pay for it. The problems that we came up with was that all young people like to experiment or challenge authority whilst they were growing up.  At that time they used mull (to break the law) without any real impact on community. However, we decided that if we agreed it could become legal then this would take away their ability to challenge authority or use mull without any real impact on community and mull would just become a gateway drug to heroin (popular back then) or other seriously addictive drugs for their natural curiosity .  We felt that if young people needed to challenge authority they were much safer sneaking and using mull than any other substance around so we voted no for that reason only.

I guess the solution would be to let everyone grow their own safely, but if it is legalised then that wont happen because you cant TAX that.  Pharma or big business type approach will be taken to grow and sell it and that will not solve the problem because the mull here for some reason already contains very high THC levels, someone's bright idea to make it more addictive and increase sales.  All that is doing is putting pressure on the medical profession to treat the withdrawal symptoms being created by that marijuana use which is apparently very common here in Oz now.

At the end of the day legalising mind altering substances can and will lead to other ongoing problems.  Nothing in this life is ever simple.

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Yes, Jessica. That is my thesis. I hear what you're saying and maybe it is a continental difference. But, here, all of that already goes on, and largely because of the illegal drug industry. Also because of the legal drug industry, i.e., prescription drugs, which are also illegal without prescription, but doesn't stop a lot of people.

And, yes. Ongoing random drug testing already occurs here, broadly and vastly. 

Even drug testing already is not reliable, though I think they have gotten better in preventing cheating since a decade or more ago. I used to know someone who consistently cheated drug tests.

I am for more self -responsibility in the world, which should automatically increase community responsibility as a check. I realize that is optimistic and puts great faith in humans, but I think we need to go in that direction to evolve out of the regimes we're currently subject to. 

Anyway, I'm OK to agree to disagree. And I do get what you're saying. 

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On 2/11/2017 at 2:23 PM, Jessica said:

Can you imagine every person being high on drugs legally every day of their lives.  Dr's, nurses, police and firemen for example all high and trying to do their jobs

imagining...all prescribed narcotics, also prozac, paxil, welbutrin, zoloft, abilify, trazadone, benadryl, and others.  yeah, i can imagine...legally....minds messed up legally with aluminum, mercury, msg, aspartame, fluoride et al...legally... 

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Exactly, how many people in the US are on Prozac or anti depressants again - its about half the adult population isn't it, or a lot anyway.  Now lets get the other half off their face using manipulated or contaminated weed and all problems will be solved - Utopia. 

They are not going to legally supply people with your natural home grown stuff slayer.  There are never easy solutions that are free of negative blowback at some point or other, that's all I am saying. 

Actually, I don't really care one way or another - I am just trying to supply an alternative point of view in this debate. I am not a drug user and do not believe in mind altering drugs being freely available, prescription or otherwise.

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For the record, I'm not a drug user either and don't think I have to be to put forward the proposition that I have. I do however use mind altering herbs such as hops, valerian, holy basil, passion flower, california poppy, etc. I just don't think plants should be illegal. One day marijuana and hemp are illegal, next day the plants I use to manage my stress on my own are illegal. Take kratom as a case in point. It was nearly banned here in the US. And this is a plant that has helped many people ease opioid withdrawal symptoms, without the negative effects of drugs prescribed to do the same.

I could get behind regulating synthetic drugs, which would include meth, crystal, etc.

I also use vitamins, amino acids, animal glandulars, essential oils, etc. These all have a significant effect on mind and body. We are just a step away from them making those things illegal as well.  I would probably get thrown in jail because I would find the black market for that stuff in defense of my health and well-being.

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i have about 40 ft long row of passion flower vine draping down a slope tapering 6 ft to 12 ft to the road. I'm allowing it to compete with blackberries, violets, and english ivy. passion flower is upperhand. passion flower has been found as effective in treating  anxiety and panic attacks as xanax . the report noted the only difference was that passion flower didn't effect them at work like their xanax did. right now I'm harvesting my rosehips . i share your concerns kande , we start on a slippery slope when we are regulated from growing plants. tomatoes were considered toxic for centuries....tea and coffee are addictive stimulants and mood alterers, as is mate' in south amurika. kava kava ? regulate synthetics ! agree agree agree ! as for people exploring and making mistakes with plants it must be done. how else would we know the dangers of hemlock unless a few added it to their salads ? cost of natural selection and the course of human evolution. started fermenting 5 gallons of grapefruit wine 3 days ago...into carboy tomorrow or the next day....should i be regulated ? i planted some tga-subcool "jack the ripper" with a thcv % 3-5% total thc 18-21%. thcv is known as an effective treatment for those with metabolic syndrome, which i have. should i be regulated ? i also planted a few columbian thunder fu#k which is a landrace sativa (santa marta colombian gold) hybridized to an indica hybrid (alaskan thunder fu#k) from nor star genetics. should i be regulated ?

@Jessicai have no commerce in it . it is for personal use and gifts to others when available. free....legal...let me ask, am i doing something that is wrong ? should the war on drugs be raged against me and million of others of the same ilk ? i hope you don't think I'm picking a fight here because we differ in opinion. i  really am interested in open honest dialogue about the war on drugs and differences of opinion, without offense or meaning offense.

 
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Tomatoes are toxic for me. I stay away from them and most other nightshades. :-)  (Though this is in the long term. I have felt so much better since I cut tomatoes out of my life about 8 months ago. I learned this doing the autoimmune protocol. A tough, but great way to find out what your body tolerates.)

And, yes, I am ever so amazed by how effective the anxiolytic plants are for me. I have found passion flower to be quite effective, along with all of the others I mentioned. Yes, kava kava, too. Chamomile is also super effective for me. 

I wish I were a gardener/herbalist. Your garden sounds fab, Slayer.

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not really a garden. just a large yard with various plants some tended too,others not... i allow plantain, red and white clover, chicory, dandelions, and our native chamomile (pineapple flower) to grow in my yard...and i harvest these "weeds" if i want...easy to become an herbalist, plant an herb patio planter and enjoy experimenting with foods and teas. grow a rose and harvest your own rose petals and rose hips. 

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From my perspective, what you have is a garden. :)

Thanks for the suggestion. I will do just that with an herb patio planter once I get settled some place and have fewer caregiver duties (which I hope comes sooner rather than later). I want to make my own extracts as well.

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On ‎14‎/‎02‎/‎2017 at 7:55 AM, hcvslayer said:

@Jessicai have no commerce in it . it is for personal use and gifts to others when available. free....legal...let me ask, am i doing something that is wrong ? should the war on drugs be raged against me and million of others of the same ilk ? i hope you don't think I'm picking a fight here because we differ in opinion. i  really am interested in open honest dialogue about the war on drugs and differences of opinion, without offense or meaning offense.

No slayer.  I don't think you are doing anything wrong because the choices you make only affect you and no-one else.  I have no problem with what people do as long as their choices do not impact on anyone other than themselves, good or bad - they are personal choices that we are all entitled to make in our own lives. If you were a drug supplier that provided drugs to kids or whatever then yes, I would have a problem with that because the lives of others would be affected.

It is easy from comments on this or any other site to be able to recognize those who choose to use drugs and who doesn't and I have never held a negative view of anyone who chooses personal use. 

It has always been my personal choice to drink and smoke and I take the criticism and negative attitudes of people in my stride.  It's my life, my choice and if I am happy with it then what does it have to do with anyone else.  It is no different in your case, your life, your choice and it doesn't impact me or anyone else - all good. 

 

 

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I'm so very proud of all who offer your thoughts, passions and perspectives without hint of hostility.  If only our world would be so kind to one another.  This is the reason I keep coming back to Chani.  The thoughtful people, the kindness shown, the tender criticisms and the empathy felt for others.  Thank you all so very much. 

And hcvslayer, your garden does sound wonderful.

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Deadly drug seized in Queensland mail

FEBRUARY 18, 2017

Source:  news.com.au

Link:  http://www.news.com.au/national/queensland/crime/deadly-drug-seized-in-queensland-mail/news-story/dfc992d7237373d8b6edf7e5f8eb7de8?utm_content=SocialFlow&utm_campaign=EditorialSF&utm_source=News.com.au&utm_medium=Facebook

A DRUG considered a potential chemical weapon and terrorist threat has been detected in Queensland, sparking an urgent warning from authorities. The synthetic drug, carfentanyl, was intercepted by border force officers at a Brisbane mail centre and is about 10,000 times as potent as morphine.

Snip

 

 

 

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Fentanyl and now Carfentanyl are in the news pretty much every day here in BC Canada. We have an extreme problem with heroin addiction in the Vancouver area and province wide for a number of reasons I won't get into here.

Because these above mentioned synthetic opioids are so potent in such tiny amounts, even the smallest miscalculation in dose can depress the nervous system so much that breathing just stops.

Now any drug dealer worth his or her salt wants to keep the client coming back for more, which makes me extremely suspect of this sudden explosion of fentanyl and the like finding its way into street drugs.  The penalties are so harsh for trafficking fentanyl, and it so often kills the customer, that it makes little sense as a business model.

But with record numbers of dead 'junkies' whom society has little sympathy for, and stories like this one below, it's hard not to think this has been orchestrated....

B.C. transplant specialist says drug overdose organ donors on rise...

http://www.vancouversun.com/health/transplant+specialist+says+drug+overdose+organ+donors+rise/12944147/story.html

 

 

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9 hours ago, Bryan said:

Now any drug dealer with his or her salt wants to keep the client coming back for more,

This is so true.

I might have told this story before. Years ago I had surgery on my foot and was given hydrocodone to take after. It made me so nauseous and also super wired. I called the nurse and she said, "oh, we'll call in a prescription for something to help with the nausea and also lower your dose." 

Just a few weeks after that, in court (I was clerking for a federal judge at the time), we got an indictment in and the guy was being charged with possession and distribution of hydrocodone and promethazine. The promethazine is an antiemetic antihistamine and helps with nausea.

I told the assistant US attorney on the case that the drug dealer treats his clients better than the doctors you pay. The drug dealer automatically provides the antiemetic -- you don't have to call them and ask for it. :-)

The antiemetic also potentiates the hydrocodone, so that might be why the drug dealer also had it. But for all these years, I've tended to think he was taking care of his customers.

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Houston DA And Sheriff Plan To Stop Charging Marijuana Users

Posted By: RumorMail [Send E-Mail]
Date: Sunday, 19-Feb-2017 12:30:57

 

By Daniel Lang

For decades the American public has been forced to endure government policies on marijuana that are unbelievably idiotic and harmful to millions of completely innocent people. They’re so dumb that Americans have been ignoring these laws en masse, even though it threatens their safety, freedom, and prosperity. These policies are so outrageous that over the last few years, even local and state governments have been ignoring the asinine drug laws crafted by the feds.

The latest example of this resistance comes from Houston, Texas, the largest city in the state. Harris County District Attorney Kim Ogg, Sheriff Ed Gonzales, Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner, and Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo have decided that they will no longer charge anyone caught with less than 4 ounces of marijuana. The new policy will take effect on March 1st.

Anyone caught with pot will have to endure a four-hour drug class, and the marijuana in their possession will be confiscated by the police. No court appearances, no jail time, and no criminal records that could ruin the lives of harmless drug users. The officials behind this policy believe that it will save the county $10 million per year, keep 12,000 people out of the justice system, and give more resources to law enforcement for dealing with violent criminals.

The Sheriff’s office noted that “We’re really encouraged by these swift actions by the district attorney, and we are looking forward to working with Harris County’s criminal justice leadership identifying common-sense solutions to our broken criminal justice system.”

These days its pretty easy to criticize the justice system and law enforcement. After all, they’re the ones who have been ruining countless lives for decades by enforcing the drug war. But it’s heartening to see that these people are capable of opening their eyes and ignoring contemptible laws that have burdened Americans for so long.

http://www.thedailysheeple.com/

http://www.houstonpress.com/news/under-state-law-local-cops-dont-have-to-jail-you-for-pot-8387385

Source http://www.rumormillnews.com/cgi-bin/forum.cgi?#69331

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Good plan.  I have always thought that one addiction needs to be replaced with another thing to focus on.

link: "Iceland Understands How to Stop Teen Substance Abuse"

Posted By: hobie [Send E-Mail]
Date: Thursday, 16-Mar-2017 19:15:42

 

.
=====

Iceland Understands How to Stop Teen Substance Abuse
http://operationdisclosure.blogspot.com/2017/03/iceland-understands-how-to-stop-teen.html

Excerpt:

"We didn't say to them, you're coming in for treatment. We said, we'll teach you anything you want to learn: music, dance, hip hop, art, martial arts." The idea was that these different classes catering to the interests of many teenagers could get the teens excited and provide alterations in their brain chemistry. It would keep them busy for one, but also it would keep them interested and in the learning phase. Being addicted to dance is obviously a much better alternative than being addicted to drugs or alcohol.
Full article:

http://operationdisclosure.blogspot.com/2017/03/iceland-understands-how-to-stop-teen.html

Source http://www.rumormillnews.com/cgi-bin/forum.cgi?read=71279

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CGI's Liam77: Mainstream Media Finally Exposes CIA Drug Trafficking Conspiracy in Explosive History Channel Series

Posted By: RumorMail [Send E-Mail]
Date: Thursday, 27-Apr-2017 14:54:40

 

From CGI's Liam77:

https://eraoflight.com/2017/04/26/mainstream-media-finally-exposes-cia-drug-trafficking-conspiracy-in-explosive-history-channel-series/

Richard Nixon, in his effort to silence black people and antiwar activists, brought the War on Drugs into full force in 1973. He then signed Reorganization Plan No. 2, which established the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). Over the course of five decades, this senseless war has waged on. At a cost of over $1 trillion — ruining and ending countless lives in the process — America’s drug war has created a drug problem that is worse now than ever before.

This is no coincidence.

For years, those of us who’ve been paying attention have seen who profits from this inhumane war — the police state and cartels.

This horrendously corrupt and violent drug war has gotten so bad, that it is getting pushed into the mainstream. In an extremely rare move, A&E Networks, a subsidiary of ABC and the Walt Disney Company, will be addressing the government’s role in the drug war in a four-part documentary series on the History Channel, titled, “America’s War on Drugs.”

In this documentary, History channel promises to delve into items that, up until recently, were considered ‘conspiracy theory.’ CIA drug dealing is one of those such items. According to the description on A&E:

“America’s War of Drugs” is an immersive trip through the last five decades, uncovering how the CIA, obsessed with keeping America safe in the fight against communism, allied itself with the mafia and foreign drug traffickers. In exchange for support against foreign enemies, the groups were allowed to grow their drug trade in the United States.

Promising to be one of the most explosive television series in recent history, the show intends to expose the CIA’s connection to the crack epidemic.

Night one of “America’s War on Drugs” divulges covert Cold War operations that empowered a generation of drug traffickers and reveals the peculiar details of secret CIA LSD experiments which helped fuel the counter-culture movement, leading to President Nixon’s crackdown and declaration of a war on drugs. The documentary series then delves into the rise of the cocaine cowboys, a secret island “cocaine base,” the CIA’s connection to the crack epidemic, the history of the cartels and their murderous tactics, the era of “Just Say No,” the negative effect of NAFTA, and the unlikely career of an almost famous Midwest meth queen.

If the CIA trafficking cocaine into the United States sounds like some tin foil conspiracy theory, think again. Their role in the drug trade was exposed in 1996 in a critical investigative series “Dark Alliance” by Gary Webb for the San Jose Mercury News. The investigation, headed up by Webb revealed ties between the CIA, Nicaraguan Contras and the crack cocaine trade ravaging African-American communities.

The investigation provoked massive protests and congressional hearings, as well as overt backlash from the mainstream media to discredit Webb’s reporting. However, decades later, officials would come forward to back Webb’s original investigation up.

Then-senator John Kerry even released a detailed report claiming that not only was there “considerable evidence” linking the Contra effort to trafficking of drugs and weapons — but that the U.S. government knew about it.

Also, as the Free Thought Project previously reported, in a new book, Juan Pablo Escobar Henao, son of notorious Medellín cartel drug kingpin, Pablo Escobar, explains how his father “worked for the CIA.”

In the book, Pablo Escobar In Fraganti, Escobar, who lives under the pseudonym, Juan Sebastián Marroquín, explains his “father worked for the CIA selling cocaine to finance the fight against Communism in Central America.”

Going even further down the rabbit hole, the History Channel will address how US involvement in Afghanistan turned the country into a virtual heroin factory and how the drug war empowers cartels.

The final chapter of the series examines how the attacks on September 11thintertwined the War on Drugs and the War on Terror, transforming Afghanistan into a narco-state teeming with corruption. It also explores how American intervention in Mexico helped give rise to El Chapo and the Super Cartels, bringing unprecedented levels of violence and sending even more drugs across America’s borders.

The reason why the drug war actually creates a drug and violence problem is simple. And those who profit most from the drug war — drug war enforcers and cartels — all know it. When the government makes certain substances illegal, it does not remove the demand. Instead, the State creates crime by pushing the sale and control of these substances into the illegal black markets. All the while, demand remains constant.

We can look at the prohibition of alcohol and the subsequent mafia crime wave that ensued as a result as an example. The year 1930, at the peak of prohibition, happened to be the deadliest year for police in American history. 300 police officers were killed, and innumerable poor people slaughtered as the State cracked down on drinkers.

Outlawing substances does not work.

Criminal gangs form to protect sales territory and supply lines. They then monopolize the control of the constant demand. Their entire operation is dependent upon police arresting people for drugs because this grants them a monopoly on their sale.

However, the illegality of drug possession and use is what keeps the low-level users and dealers in and out of the court systems, and most of these people are poor black men. As Dr. Ron Paul has pointed out, black people are more likely to receive a harsher punishment for the same drug crime as a white person.

This revolving door of creating and processing criminals fosters the phenomenon known as Recidivism. Recidivism is a fundamental concept of criminal justice that shows the tendency of those who are processed into the system and the likelihood of future criminal behavior.

The War on Drugs takes good people and turns them into criminals every single minute of every single day. The system is set up in such a way that it fans the flames of violent crime by essentially building a factory that turns out violent criminals.

The system knows this too — as the very existence of the police state is dependent upon the drug war. When drugs are legal, there are far fewer doors to kick in, fines to collect, profit prisons to fill, and money to steal.

When drugs are legalized, gang violence drops too — drastically. Not only does it have a huge effect on the localized gangs in America, but the legalization of drugs is crippling to the violent foreign drug cartels too.

This is why the Free Thought Project and other open-minded groups all advocate bringing this bloody and criminally ineffective drug war to a sudden and grinding halt.

Hopefully, the History Channel’s new documentary will push others to question drug laws. Hopefully, the documentary wakes people up the idea that legality does not equal morality and that government force, via kidnapping, caging, and killing, is no way to solve an addiction problem. Hopefully.

Source http://www.rumormillnews.com/cgi-bin/forum.cgi?read=74168

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Drug Cop Who Spent 14 Years Undercover Tells Truth About the Drug War

May 15, 2017 

Written by Carey Wedler

Source:  http://theantimedia.org/undercover-drug-cop-drug-war/

 

(ANTIMEDIA) Yet another police officer is speaking out against the drug war, this time in the United Kingdom. Former officer Neil Woods worked as an undercover drug cop for 14 years, infiltrating some of the most violent gangs in Britain only to learn his tactics were worsening the drug epidemic. Now, he advocates ending the drug war and decriminalizing drugs as he admits his own role in fueling violence and the proliferation of narcotics.

Woods recently spoke with the Independent to make his case and recount the struggles he faced enforcing the British government’s drug war. He was first enlisted by the Home Office to tackle the crack cocaine epidemic in the early 1990s, an effort that apparently ‘pleased the crown.’

Woods says the tactics he helped develop only exacerbated drug-related crime.

 

The first place I was posted was in Derby and it wasn’t actually that difficult,” he says. “There were some proper gangsters selling crack and heroin but they weren’t used to the tactic, so although it was a bit scary it wasn’t tremendously difficult because they weren’t expecting it.”

By bringing in new police tactics, however, the dynamics started to change because, as he says, “the thing the about undercover work is that it doesn’t take long for criminals to learn the tactics.”

Woods recounted several close-call experiences, including one where he was forced to consume amphetamines to prove his credibility. In another, a dealer could sense Woods was a cop and repeatedly pressed him on it before he used intimidation tactics to neutralize the situation.  Though he escaped unscathed, he often put his life on the line only to find his work was futile.

The ultimate defence against the development of police tactics is an increased use of violence to intimidate the community in which undercover police officers move,” he explained, describing the effects of government efforts to curb drug use.

As the drug war raged on, drug gangs became even more extreme, and Woods began to realize he wasn’t helping.

I knew that I couldn’t win early on,” he told the Independent. “But I kept being tempted back into it because I was good at my job. The police departments would say ‘Woodsy, we need you. These gangsters are even nastier that the other ones. They’re burning people to death. They’re using rape as a weapon.”

Ultimately, however, he accepted his inability to make a difference as a cop.

t was because of me that organised crime was getting nasty. I was developing the tactics. I put dealers in 

prison for over 1000 years and I only disrupted the heroin supply for two hours. Policing can’t affect the demand so policing drugs is completely futile. I can’t emphasise that enough. More people die and it gets more violent. Drugs have got stronger and cheaper and more varied since the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971.”

He also described his experience getting to know drug addicts as he worked undercover. Asked what the biggest misconception about them is, he explained:

When I went into policing I thought addicts had made the mistake of trying drugs and had no willpower to stop. Actually, problematic drug users – or at least all the ones I knew – were self medicating. Most of the heroin users I knew were self-medicating for childhood trauma, whether physical or sexual. As an undercover officer I spent a great deal of time getting to know these people. The more I knew someone the more I could manipulate them. They’re like puppets. And they trusted me and saw me as a peer.

Describing one female victim of childhood sexual abuse, he explained, “To the law, she’s a criminal to the law and I as an agent of the state was there to capture people like that. But they were caught in the crossfire between the police and gangs.”

Though Woods doesn’t advocate a “free for all” on drugs, he does believe the war on them must end. “The answer is to regulate drugs and take the power away from organised crime,” he argues. “The illicit drugs market is worth £7billion a year. Our communities are ruined by organised crime intimidating populations to protect themselves so we need to regulate the drug supply like we do with alcohol.

He cites Switzerland’s establishment of controlled heroin injection centers in the 1990s as an example, an approach recently adopted in Canada, as well. He also cites Portugal, which has had great success with his policy of decriminalization.

Woods seeks to live by his principles to undo the damage he helped inflict on drug-riddled communities by speaking out against past failed policies.

Woods launched the U.K. version of  Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP), an organization of officers who advocate against the war on drugs. There is also an American LEAP that works toward the same goal.

I used to risk my life doing the work because I used to believe I was doing good,” he says.
Now I realise everything I did only caused harm. Now, I feel duty bound to continue taking risks because it’s a matter of principle.

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If you can't beat them, join them?  The War on Drugs is hard to win when so many are actually doing everything in their power to make sure those drugs are available.

American Media Silent After UN Just Called For Decriminalizing Drug Use Worldwide

Posted By: HotCoffee
Date: Wednesday, 5-Jul-2017 19:55:23

 

A little-noticed public statement issued by the United Nations last week contains a dramatic shift in thinking on the issue of “illicit” substance use. After recommitting to the failed idea of prohibition just last year, the UN is now calling for the worldwide decriminalization of drug use and possession.

The statement, put out by the World Health Organization (WHO) as the U.S. is in the midst of another political debate over health care, calls for “ending discrimination in health care settings.” The WHO calls on states to end discrimination against “marginalized and stigmatized populations” in a variety of ways, and includes a blunt and rather shocking statement on the drug war.

“We, the signatory United Nations entities, call upon all stakeholders to join us in committing to taking targeted, coordinated, time-bound, multisectoral actions in the following areas. Supporting States to put in place guarantees against discrimination in law, policies, and regulations by… Reviewing and repealing punitive laws that have been proven to have negative health outcomes and that counter established public health evidence. These include laws that criminalize or otherwise prohibit…drug use or possession of drugs for personal use.”

the rest is here

http://countercurrentnews.com/2017/07/american-media-silent-after-un-just-called-for-decriminalizing-drug-use-worldwide/

Source http://www.rumormillnews.com/cgi-bin/forum.cgi?read=78664

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