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ANIMAL/MAMMAL/BIRD/FISH DEATHS (A RECORD)

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Just In: Emergency closure of fishery along entire West Coast — Almost no babies surviving since 2011 — “Catastrophic crash… Population decimated… Crisis… Collapse so severe” — “Latest in series of alarming die-offs… mass reproductive failures… strange diseases” — Official: “A lot of weird things out there”

 

Read more...  http://enenews.com/emergency-closure-fishery-along-entire-west-coast-practically-babies-survived-2011-population-decimated-catastrophic-crash-collapse-severe-latest-series-alarming-die-offs-along-west-coast-mas

 

 

Sardine population collapses, prompting ban on commercial fishing

By Peter Fimrite

Updated 12:05 pm, Tuesday, April 14, 2015

The sardine population along the West Coast has collapsed due to changing ocean conditions and other factors, including allegations of overfishing, prompting regulators Monday to cancel fishing next season and schedule a vote this week on an immediate emergency ban.

 

The Pacific Fishery Management Council agreed to close the fishery from Mexico to the Canadian border starting July 1, when the 2015 season begins, after federal scientists documented a 91 percent decline in sardine numbers along the West Coast since 2007.

 

The council, a 19-member policymaking organization made up of fishery representatives from California, Oregon, Washington and Idaho, scheduled a vote Wednesday on whether to take the bigger step of immediately halting sardine fishing. The current season would go until June 30 or until between 3,000 and 4,000 metric tons of the schooling fish are hauled out of the water, fulfilling this season’s quota.

“This is a huge step,” said Geoffrey Shester, the California campaign director for Oceana, an international conservation organization that has been fighting for eight years to lower the annual sardine take and implement stricter regulations. “This is one of the most lucrative fisheries in California, so to completely shut it down is a huge deal.”

 

http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/Sardine-population-collapses-prompts-ban-on-6197380.php

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Tonnes of dead fish removed from Rio Olympic rowing venue

April 17, 2015

 

 

"Brazilian workers have removed more than 33 tonnes of dead fish from the 2016 Olympic rowing and canoeing venue in Rio de Janeiro.

A team of more than 60 people have been working since last week to clear the remains from Lagoa Rodrigo de Freitas.

Scientists said the fish were starved of oxygen because of pollution.

Water quality has also been a major concern for organisers in Guanabara Bay, where Olympic sailing events are due to be held.

The overwhelming smell at the lagoon has led to complaints from residents and members of local rowing clubs.

Rio's environmental secretariat said on Thursday that the deaths were the result of a sudden change in water temperature, but scientists rejected that explanation.

Paul Rosman, an oceanographer who works at the lagoon, told Reuters that a rise in algae blooms had led to a build up of carbon dioxide in the water."

snip

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-32345508

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Mass death of seabirds in Western U.S. is ‘unprecedented’ – unexplained changes within ocean to blame

 

In the storm debris littering a Washington State shoreline, Bonnie Wood saw something grisly: the mangled bodies of dozens of scraggly young seabirds. In the storm debris littering a Washington State shoreline, Bonnie Wood saw something grisly: the mangled bodies of dozens of scraggly young seabirds. Walking half a mile along the beach at Twin Harbors State Park on Wednesday, Wood spotted more than 130 carcasses of juvenile Cassin’s auklets—the blue-footed, palm-size victims of what is becoming one of the largest mass die-offs of seabirds ever recorded. “It was so distressing,” recalled Wood, a volunteer who patrols Pacific Northwest beaches looking for dead or stranded birds. “They were just everywhere. Every ten yards we’d find another ten bodies of these sweet little things.”

Cassin’s auklets are tiny diving seabirds that look like puffballs. They feed on animal plankton and build their nests by burrowing in the dirt on offshore islands. Their total population, from the Baja Peninsula to Alaska’s Aleutian Islands, is estimated at somewhere between 1 million and 3.5 million. Last year, beginning about Halloween, thousands of juvenile auklets started washing ashore dead from California’s Farallon Islands to Haida Gwaii (also known as the Queen Charlotte Islands) off central British Columbia. Since then the deaths haven’t stopped. Researchers are wondering if the die-off might spread to other birds or even fish.

 

https://theextinctionprotocol.wordpress.com/2015/05/19/mass-death-of-seabirds-in-western-u-s-is-unprecedented-unexplained-changes-within-ocean-to-blame/

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Stranded Sea Lion Pups fall Victim to California's "Ocean Deserts'

May 19, 2015

 

Thousands of young seal lions are being found ashore, as those concerned about climate change and animal welfare speculate on the state's changing ecosystem.

 

 

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A cart of deceased malnourished and dehydrated sea lions that had been stranded along the northern California coast, await their turn for necropsy. Photograph: Peter Dasilva/EPA

 

"

 

he waters of the Pacific off the coast of California are a clear, shimmering blue today, so transparent it’s possible to see the sandy bottom below.

Viewing the ocean from the state’s famous craggy headlands, it’s impossible to know that the ocean’s unusual clarity is hiding a cruel beauty: clear water is a sign that the ocean is turning into a desert, and the chain reaction that causes that bitter clarity is perhaps most obvious on the beaches of the Golden State, where thousands of emaciated sea lion pups are stranded.

Sea lions are a ubiquitous part of the Californian landscape – they’re up and down beaches, piers and wharfs, with an overall population estimated at around 300,000. They have the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 to thank for their existence, passed by Congress in response to concerns about dwindling populations of marine mammals, including sea lions.

Now, the familiar creatures have become victims of their own success, with some arguing that their population may have reached natural capacity, and others blaming it on changing environmental conditions in California."

snip

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/may/08/california-stranded-sea-lions-pacific-ocean

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One-third of endangered saiga antelope mysteriously die off in a few days, up to 85,000 dead

 

Authorities in Kazakhstan says around one-third of the endangered saiga antelope population in this Central Asian nation has mysteriously died off in the last few days.

Kazakhstan’s agriculture ministry said Friday the number of saiga that have died may have reached 85,000.

 

http://news.nationalpost.com/news/world/one-third-of-endangered-saiga-antelope-mysteriously-die-off-in-a-few-days-up-to-85000-dead

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Mysterious disease threatens Australian turtle with extinction – hundreds of turtles dead, scientists puzzled on disease

 

Just three months – that’s all it took to wipe almost every member of a species of turtles off of the map. It all started in mid-February when canoeists paddling down the Bellinger River in New South Wales, Australia, came across several dead and dying turtles. Since then more than 400 dead turtles have shown up. Dozens more sick turtles were also recovered, each of which was lethargic, emaciated and covered in infected lesions in their eyes, skin and even internal organs. None of the infected turtles survived. The 60-kilometer river is the only home to the Bellinger River snapping turtle (Elsaya georgesi), a rare but little-studied species that has already been on the decline for years due to pollution and predation by invasive foxes. Scientists now fear that this mysterious, as-yet-unidentified disease has reached 90 percent of the turtle’s habitat and could cause the species’ imminent extinction.

Is there hope? So far 17 apparently healthy turtles have been captured and brought into safety. University of Western Sydney zoologist Ricky Spencer says the 10 males and seven females—all that could be located by a multiagency team of wildlife experts—will spend up to the next eight months in quarantine where they will be monitored daily for signs of the disease.

 

https://theextinctionprotocol.wordpress.com/2015/05/27/mysterious-disease-threatens-australian-turtle-with-extinction-hundreds-of-turtles-dead-scientists-puzzled-on-disease/

post-12-0-10410100-1432762755_thumb.png

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Whales in mass stranding at Staffin on Skye

June 2, 2015

 

 

"Rescuers have gone to the aid of 21 long-finned pilot whales which stranded on the shore at Staffin on Skye.

British Divers Marine Life Rescue said 18 of the animals were floated back out to sea at about 04:00 on Tuesday. Two more were later floated.

However, several of the whales then stranded on the shores of nearby Staffin Island.

It was understood that eight of the whales have died and nine remain stranded on the small island.

The coastguard said it could be high tide at 19:00 before those animals could be pushed back into open water.

It was believed the stranding was caused by a female whale getting into difficulty while calving. The calf died.

Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Trust raised the alarm after seeing whales in distress on Monday afternoon."

_83373364_rescueeight.jpg

the effort to rescue the whales started in the early hours of Tuesday

snip

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-32973059

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I think that human beings are  criminal noadays because they're the cuase of all animal deaths.

 

 

 

There is no excuse for human behaviour in causing both plant and animal extinctions, specially in the case of the larger 'exotic' animals (elephants, lions, tigers, rinos, etc.) that are being hunted as trophies or for medicines.

 

But also, a lot of animals and plants have 'fulfilled' their time here on Gaia Mother Earth, and for various reasons, are leaving (and becoming extinct), and now we have many more new species starting to come in.

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One-third of endangered saiga antelope mysteriously die off in a few days, up to 85,000 dead

 

Authorities in Kazakhstan says around one-third of the endangered saiga antelope population in this Central Asian nation has mysteriously died off in the last few days.

Kazakhstan’s agriculture ministry said Friday the number of saiga that have died may have reached 85,000.

 

http://news.nationalpost.com/news/world/one-third-of-endangered-saiga-antelope-mysteriously-die-off-in-a-few-days-up-to-85000-dead

 

 

on the money redd, what is going on ? continuing ?

 

"In just two-and-a-half weeks in mid-May, something killed more than 120,000 saiga - or 35 percent of the global population."

"According to the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the research mission to Kazakhstan has identified two pathogens - specifically Pasteurella and Clostridia - as possible culprits behind the outbreak. But, according to Kock, these bacteria are only lethal to an animal if its immune system is compromised."

 

http://www.dw.de/global-ideas-saiga-antelope-conservation-disease-kazakhstan/a-18498052?maca=en-rss-en-all-1573-rdf

 

"Nearly half of the global population of the critically endangered saiga antelope (Saiga tatarica) is feared dead in a mass die-off."

"“I have worked in veterinary diseases all my career and I have never seen 100% mortality,” says Richard Kock, a wildlife veterinarian at the Royal Veterinary College in Hatfield, UK, who flew out to Kazakhstan last month to assist with efforts to make sense of the devastation. “We had a herd of 60,000 aggregated and they all died. That is extraordinary.”"

" “Epidemiologically, you cannot get a directly transmitted disease to kill a whole population in seven days,” says Kock. “I’d say it’s a polymicrobial disease,” he says. This involves pathogens such as pasteurella and clostridia that are often present in the body but have seized an opportunity to run riot."

"The pathogens may have been responsible for the deaths, but something must have caused the saigas to fall victim to them. Given that two discrete sub-populations some 300 kilometres apart suffered similarly and simultaneously, it seems likely that an environmental factor is part of the story."

 

 

http://www.nature.com/news/mysterious-die-off-sparks-race-to-save-saiga-antelope-1.17675

 

very interesting….a bacteria ? not a virus….. any weaponized bacteria out there….mailed out to other countries….? certainly 1st rule out would be anthrax…...

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in above vid it lays the cause on el nino.  the warming of our coastal waters here whether from a current or a host of other possible causes (i.e. geo thermal / geo-engineered ) warming of the waters will create a large algae bloom which they have used before to blame on algae for oxygen use and fish suffocate…my 2 cents is that the algae bloom occurs and releases domoic acid and this has its reverberations throughout marine biology. maybe above is related to domoic acid…interesting to find out...

 

"The California Department of Public Health (CDPH) is advising consumers not to eat recreationally harvested mussels and clams, commercially or recreationally caught anchovy and sardines, or the internal organs of commercially or recreationally caught crab taken from Monterey and Santa Cruz counties. CDPH is working with commercial fisherman in the area to ensure that recently harvested anchovy and sardines were not distributed into the human food supply. "

"Dangerous levels of domoic acid have been detected in some of these species and are also likely to be present in the other species. Molluscan bivalve shellfish, anchovy and sardines are especially of concern because the toxin resides in their digestive tract and these seafood products are normally not eviscerated prior to consumption. "

 

http://www.cdph.ca.gov/Pages/NR15-038.aspx

 

we here on the cali coast started our annual quarantine on mussels and shellfish on may 1st. so the above warning that came out june 1st is focused at commercial food products.

 

"This quarantine is intended to protect the public from paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) and domoic acid poisoning (DAP). Both of these toxins are linked to plankton consumed by filter-feeding animals such as bivalve shellfish, like mussels and clams."

"“This quarantine protects the public from severe illness, including coma and death,” said Smith. “There is no known antidote to the toxins that have been found in mussels, and these toxins cannot be reliably destroyed by cooking. We appreciate the public honoring the quarantine. It’s very important to protect yourself from what could be a very serious illness.” 

 "Commercially harvested shellfish are not included in the annual quarantine. That’s because all commercial shellfish harvesters in California are certified by the state and subject to strict testing requirements to ensure that all oysters, clams and mussels entering the marketplace are free of toxins. "

 

​ok fine but now the dangerous levels are in anchovies and sardines ? oops…..

 

http://www.cdph.ca.gov/Pages/NR15-031.aspx

 

heres a lil news from the region...

 

"When it blooms, it releases domoic acid, which can be deadly to some species."

"MBARI sensors in the bay record toxins in real-time. Kudela said scientists have not seen toxin levels like this in the Monterey Bay since 2000."

"Birch said toxins from the bloom will have a chain reaction on marine animals, and reports of dead seabirds are already coming in."

"Researchers believe that another factor could be the warm blob of ocean water that’s been sitting over the West Coast this winter and spring.

"Both last year and this year, there are the warm blobs across the whole West Coast, and that is at least suspicious," Kudela said."

 

http://www.ksbw.com/news/toxic-algal-bloom-growing-rapidly-in-monterey-bay/33276962?absolute=true

 

this last link is for the braniacs that wanna know more about this relatively new toxin (1987) that is a threat to the globe…..

 

"However, there are documented cases of domoic acid intoxication in wild animals and outbreaks of coastal water contamination in many regions world-wide. Hence domoic acid continues to pose a global risk to the health and safety of humans and wildlife. "

"The aim of this document is to provide a comprehensive review of ASP, DOM induced pathology including ultrastructural changes associated to subchronic oral exposure, and discussion of key proposed mechanisms of cell/tissue injury involved in DOM induced brain pathology and considerations relevant to food safety and human health."

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2525487/

 

 

 

just a hunch…that somewhere down the road blame will be placed on marijuana grows and use of fertilizers in runoff drainage has caused this…..i want to know more about the warm "blobs" loitering off our coasts , don't you ?

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Gov’t: “This is unprecedented in extent and magnitude”… toxic bloom may stretch from Calif. to Alaska — Largest event ever recorded? — Official: “It’s new territory… we’ve never had to close essentially half our coast” — Fish washing up “extremely poisonous” — “Serious concern for coastal communities”
 
snip
Seattle Times, Jun 15, 2015: [/size]Toxic algae bloom might be largest ever — Scientists onboard a NOAA research vessel are beginning a survey of what could be the [/size]largest toxic algae bloom ever recorded off the West Coast… At the same time, two other types of toxins rarely seen in combination are turning up,,, along the Washington coast… the [/size]toxin has never hit so hard in the spring, [/size]or required such widespread closures for crabs… concentrations in California anchovies this year [are] as [/size]high as any ever measured… [Dan Ayres with Washington's Dept. of Fish & Wildlife] recently spotted a sea lion wracked by seizures… collapsed into a fetal position and quivered… Domoic-acid contamination is rare in Puget Sound, but several beds have been closed this year because of…  paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) and a [/size]relatively new threat called diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP). The [/size]first confirmed case of DSP poisoning in the United States [/size]occurred in 2011 [in Washington]… 2015 is the first time regulators have detected dangerous levels of PSP, DSP and domoic acid in the state at the same time — and in some cases, in the same places…[/size]
snip[/size]
http://enenews.com/govt-unprecedented-toxic-bloom-west-coast-largest-event-recorded
 
 

WEST COAST WARNING/LARGEST EVER TOXIC BLOOM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l1Patp6gToY&feature=youtu.be

BPEarthwatch

 

Gee, wonder how much geoengineering of everything the brilliant scientists think they can do, or for how many decades, before it all comes back to haunt us?    How about radiation?  Unnatural radiation that is, can the water, air and earth handle? 

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while something else goes out something else comes

 

i copied some bits here

 

Shark! Yes, sharks are returning north, and eating seals But killer whales are probably eating the sharks

DAVID MURPHY

shark_ferguson_digi.jpg
Dr. Steve Ferguson speaks at the Arctic Change conference in Ottawa in December 2014. (PHOTO BY DAVID MURPHY)

 

 

“The North Atlantic was pretty messed up with all the commercial whaling and overharvesting that went on,” Ferguson said.

“So we may be seeing things starting to return. Not back to the way they were, but we’re having a lot more big whales. Humpbacks and bowheads are certainly increasing.” 

And Ferguson said people have told him they’ve seen sperm whales and dolphin species off the coast of Baffin Island.

But while this burgeoning biodiversity may sound like a good thing, it spells trouble for ice-dependent mammals such as whales and seals.

“In fact there is some indication that they are having trouble already,” Ferguson said.

Inuit hunters have told Ferguson that ringed seals don’t seem to be doing well on Baffin Island.

“In the case of beluga and narwhal, and maybe bowhead as well, I think there’s more killer whale predation going on,” Ferguson said.

“And the killer whales avoid the ice. So the less ice they have, the bigger playground they have to do their killing and eating.

“So we don’t see a problem yet, but it’s something we have to watch.” 

For now, ringed seal and bearded seal populations in Nunavut are fine, Ferguson said.

The U.S. National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration has put both species on its endangered species list, but the Canadian Arctic archipelago helps seals survive.

 

“In the case of beluga and narwhal, and maybe bowhead as well, I think there’s more killer whale predation going on,” Ferguson said.

“And the killer whales avoid the ice. So the less ice they have, the bigger playground they have to do their killing and eating.

“So we don’t see a problem yet, but it’s something we have to watch.” 

For now, ringed seal and bearded seal populations in Nunavut are fine, Ferguson said.

The U.S. National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration has put both species on its endangered species list, but the Canadian Arctic archipelago helps seals survive.

Those Arctic islands, “trap the ice in the area. So our seal populations are probably doing pretty good.”

So what happens when sea ice melts faster, or forms slower?

“We’re going to really notice problems with the seals that need ice and the whales that use ice, and the polar bear,” Ferguson said.

“They’re predicting a significant loss of sea ice in the next 20 and 30 years. So it’s coming pretty fast.”

To help stop the pace of climate change, people must change their habits, Ferguson said. And a big part of that means curbing our addiction to consumption.

“If we have big salaries we’re going to spend it. And when we spend it we’re going to destroy the environment incrementally.” 

 

http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674shark_yes_sharks_are_bouncing_back_in_the_arctic_and_eating_seals/

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a blob effected by the blob…man i love this descriptive use of this word….

 

""We can't say for sure why we're seeing so many, but the Bay temperatures are definitely warmer this year," Dill said.

The warm coastal waters also are linked to the appearance of a small pink slug called Hopkin's rose nudibranch in Northern California waters this year, said Terry Gosliner, senior curator at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. The small slug is typically found much farther south of the Bay Area."We're seeing more of these kinds of warming events, and I suspect it may be part of long-term global change," Gosliner said. "These are signals."

http://www.contracostatimes.com/news/ci_28302236/invasion-blob-giant-purple-sea-slugs-slime-east

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VP9URw8YJCs

 

now "THE BLOB"

 

http://www.contracostatimes.com/portlet/article/html/imageDisplay.jsp?contentItemRelationshipId=6875411

 

"The blob -- that's the technical term -- first appeared in late 2013 as a smudge of warm water near Alaska. It then expanded southeast and merged with warm waters farther south, growing into an anomaly that extended from the Aleutian Islands to Baja California and stretched hundreds of miles west toward Hawaii "Just the enormous magnitude of this anomaly is what's incredible," said Art Miller, an oceanographer at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography in La Jolla. "

 

http://www.contracostatimes.com/breaking-news/ci_28293176/ocean-investigators-set-their-sights-pacific-ocean-blob?source=rss

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Thousands of birds abandon eggs, nests on Florida island

 

The din created by thousands of nesting birds is usually the first thing you notice about Seahorse Key, a 150-acre mangrove-covered dune off Florida's Gulf Coast.

But in May, the key fell eerily quiet all at once.

Thousands of little blue herons, roseate spoonbills, snowy egrets, pelicans and other chattering birds were gone. Nests sat empty in trees; eggs broken and scattered on the muddy ground.

"It's a dead zone now," said Vic Doig, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist. "This is where the largest bird colony on the Gulf Coast of Florida used to be."

For decades, Seahorse Key has been a protected way station for myriad bird species. It's part of the Cedar Keys National Wildlife Refuge, which was established in 1929 as a sanctuary for birds devastated by decades of hunting for their colorful plumage. Accessible only by boat, today it's a rare island off Florida not dominated by human activity and development.

When the birds come to nest, so too do biologists and naturalists who study the different colonies. But this year, the birds' exit has the state's avian biologists scrambling for answers.

 

http://news.yahoo.com/thousands-birds-abandon-eggs-nests-florida-island-085544094.html

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Anthrax probe after mysterious bison deaths in Montana

July 14, 2015

 

 

 

More than a dozen bison have died in mysterious circumstances prompting concern that the herd may have been infected with anthrax

 

"nvestigators are probing whether anthrax played a role in the mysterious deaths of more than a dozen bison at an American Indian reservation in Montana, the state veterinarian said on Thursday.

Marty Zaluski said the bison, which have died since the start of the July 4 weekend at the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation, may have succumbed to anthrax. But he said more testing was needed to confirm what he emphasized was an early suspicion.

Anthrax bacteria can be found naturally in soils but the infectious and sometimes deadly disease it can cause is rare in humans and animals in the United States, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control.

Spores of naturally occurring anthrax can lie dormant in the environment for years without being ingested or breathed in by grazing livestock or wild animals, according to the CDC."
snip

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/usa/11730374/Anthrax-probe-after-mysterious-bison-deaths-in-Montana.html

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Dozens of sturgeon found dead in Columbia River

July 16, 2015

Annette Cary

 

"Washington Fish and Wildlife officials have received repeated reports of dead sturgeon this week on the Columbia River, but the exact cause of death remains a mystery."

 

 

410f354a-2bd2-11e5-8a26-9b7c05211164-102

Sophia Murillo of Kennewick, left, and Frank Carr of Sequim wade into the Columbia River Wednesday to check out an estimated seven-foot long dead sturgeon at the east end of Pasco’s Wade Park near Road 39. State fish... (Bob Brawdy/Tri-City Herald) 

 

"On a walk along the Columbia River on Wednesday afternoon, Frank Carr spotted what he thought was a log in the river.

 

But as he, his fiancee and her cousin got closer, they could see fins and whiskers gently waving in the water. It was a dead 7-foot sturgeon, being pushed back and forth in shallow water as the river lapped along the shore.

 

A little farther downriver, they saw another dead sturgeon, this one a little smaller but still more than 5 feet long.

 

Washington Fish and Wildlife officials have received repeated reports of dead sturgeon this week on the Columbia River.

 

On Wednesday, Paul Hoffarth, district biologist for the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife, began adding up the sightings.

 

His rough total came to 66 dead sturgeon in the Columbia River from McNary Dam to Boardman. More than 20 were reported upstream, from the Hanford Reach downstream to the McNary Dam.

 

The exact cause of the die-off of the largest freshwater fish in North America is a mystery.

snip

 

http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/dozens-of-sturgeon-found-dead-in-columbia-river/

 

Now why they'd call this a mystery is a mystery to me!!  It is a known fact that the containers holding NUCLEAR WASTE at Hanford have been leaking for decades!!  DECADES!! Have, in fact, been seeping into the ground and leeching into the Columbia River, thereby contaminating all the ground and that river for close to 50 years now. Please spare me the fallacies you're trying to spin about warm water, etc., being the cause.

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Deadly Fungus is Killing US Snakes, Leaves None Alive

 

It's very rare for a disease to boast a 100 percent mortality rate. Rabies, for instance, is considered the deadliest disease in the world and even it has seen a handful of exceptionally lucky survivors. However, in the case of a new fungal disease sweeping through North American snakes, experts are reporting only death and more death.

 

"Reports of fungus on snakes started trickling in a few years ago, and there has been some concern that this represents a new emerging threat," David Stern, a herpetologist at Auburn University recently explained in the University of Washington's Conservation Magazine.
And there is certainly a lot of reason for concern. Fungal diseases have recently been ravaging amphibian populations across half the globe, and while that wouldn't include snakes, it does set a precedent for taking fungal epidemics seriously.

 

http://www.natureworldnews.com/articles/15719/20150719/deadly-fungus-killing-snakes-leaves-none-alive.htm

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