Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'brain'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • GENERAL DISCUSSION (MAIN)
    • General Discussion
    • The CHANI Knowledge Base (Ask A Chani Member)
    • General "Surface" Intel Board for The Watcher.
    • CHANI's Believe It or Not Board
    • Music & Humor (Funny and Entertaining stuff)
    • CHANI VIP MEMBERS BOARD
    • AIM Whispers
    • The WTH? Board. (A Place for Controversial, Hijacked, Drama, Rant and OP Busted threads.)
    • FORUM HELP TOPICS & NOTIFICATIONS
    • The Alternative News Project - ANP
    • Alternative News Project (ANP) News Feed
  • Dedicated Community Topic Boards - CURRENT AFFAIRS
    • GEOPOLITICS
    • ANCIENT MYSTERIES
    • THE UNEXPLAINED
    • SCIENCE FUTURES
    • HEALTH & HEALING
    • FUKUSHIMA
    • The MAPPING Board
    • EARTH EVENTS
    • Problem Nuclear Reactors
    • PSYCHIC Healing and Relevant Topics
    • Google Earth Navigators
    • CoEvolution
    • Book of Aquarius - Alchemy of the 21st Century
    • Return of The Gods
  • CHANI PROJECT FORUM BOARDS
    • ANNOUNCEMENTS (NEW) Please Read
    • THE CHANI PROJECT
    • Question and Answers (Q&A)

Found 7 results

  1. Experts: New Computers Can Delete Thoughts Without Your Knowledge Ian Johnston April 26, 2017 Wikipedia Commons "Neurotech scientists are rapidly mapping the brain and discovering new ways of controlling your thoughts and memories. Remember, Technocrats push the envelope because they can, without caring one whit about the collateral damage to humanity. ⁃ TN Editor “Thou canst not touch the freedom of my mind,” wrote the playwright John Milton in 1634. But, nearly 400 years later, technological advances in machines that can read our thoughts mean the privacy of our brain is under threat. Now two biomedical ethicists are calling for the creation of new human rights laws to ensure people are protected, including “the right to cognitive liberty” and “the right to mental integrity”. Scientists have already developed devices capable of telling whether people are politically right-wing or left-wing. In one experiment, researchers were able to read people’s minds to tell with 70 per cent accuracy whether they planned to add or subtract two numbers. Facebook also recently revealed it had been secretly working on technology to read people’s minds so they could type by just thinking. http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/facebook-mind-reading-brain-technology-building-8-regina-dugan-pentagon-a7692481.html And medical researchers have managed to connect part of a paralysed man’s brain to a computer to allow him to stimulate muscles in his arm so he could move it and feed himself. http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/paralysed-man-moves-arm-for-first-time-in-years-using-brain-implant-that-can-read-his-thoughts-a7654761.html The ethicists, writing in a paper in the journal Life Sciences, Society and Policy, stressed the “unprecedented opportunities” that would result from the “ubiquitous distribution of cheaper, scalable and easy-to-use neuro-applications” that would make neurotechnology “intricately embedded in our everyday life”. https://lsspjournal.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s40504-017-0050-1 However, such devices are open to abuse on a frightening degree, as the academics made clear. They warned that “malicious brain-hacking” and “hazardous uses of medical neurotechnology” could require a redefinition of the idea of mental integrity. “We suggest that in response to emerging neurotechnology possibilities, the right to mental integrity should not exclusively guarantee protection from mental illness or traumatic injury but also from unauthorised intrusions into a person’s mental wellbeing performed through the use of neurotechnology, especially if such intrusions result in physical or mental harm to the neurotechnology user,” the ethicists wrote. “The right to mental privacy is a neuro-specific privacy right which protects private or sensitive information in a person’s mind from unauthorised collection, storage, use, or even deletion in digital form or otherwise.” And they warned that the techniques were so sophisticated that people’s minds might be being read or interfered with without their knowledge. “Illicit intrusions into a person’s mental privacy may not necessarily involve coercion, as they could be performed under the threshold of a persons’ conscious experience,” they wrote in the paper." http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/delete-thoughts-read-your-mind-without-your-knowledge-neurotechnology-new-human-rights-laws-a7701661.html edited title and tags to include DNA and quantum technology
  2. 29 January 2014 by John Cryan and Timothy Dinan "Gut bugs can change the way our brains work, offering new ways to relieve problems like stress, anxiety and depression, say two leading professors" Leader: "Counting the hidden victims of medicine" "WE HAVE all experienced the influence of gut bacteria on our emotions. Just think how you felt the last time you had a stomach bug. Now it is becoming clear that certain gut bacteria can positively influence our mood and behaviour. The way they achieve this is gradually being uncovered, raising the possibility of unlocking new ways to treat neurobehavioural disorders such as depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). We acquire our intestinal microbes immediately after birth, and live in an important symbiotic relationship with them. There are far more bacteria in your gut than cells in your body, and their weight roughly equals that of your brain. These bacteria have a vast array of genes, capable of producing hundreds if not thousands of chemicals, many of which influence your brain. In fact, bacteria produce some of the same molecules as those used in brain signalling, such as dopamine, serotonin and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Furthermore, the brain is predominantly made of fats, and many of these fats are also produced by the metabolic activity of bacteria. In the absence of gut bacteria, brain structure and function are altered. Studies of mice reared in a germ-free environment, with no exposure to bacteria, show that such mice have alterations in memory, emotional state and behaviour. They show autistic patterns of behaviour, spending as much time focusing on inanimate objects as on other mice. This behavioural change is driven by alterations in the underlying brain chemistry. For example, dramatic changes in serotonin transmission are seen, together with changes in key molecules such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which plays a fundamental role in forming new synapses. These findings give weight to the notion of probiotics – bacteria with a health benefit. Probiotics were first proposed by Russian biologist Élie Metchnikoff who, in the early 1900s, observed that people living in a region of Bulgaria who consumed fermented food tended to live longer. However, it now seems that certain bacteria – dubbed psychobiotics – might have a mental-health benefit, too. Although the field of psychobiotics is in its infancy, there are already promising signs. Last year, for instance, researchers from the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena showed that when the bacterium Bacteroides fragilis was given early in life, it corrected some of the behavioural and gastrointestinal deficits in a mouse model of autism. And previous reports indicate that Bifidobacterium infantis is effective in an animal model of depression. How exactly do gut bacteria influence the brain? The mechanisms are becoming clear. The bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus, which is used in dairy products, has potent anti-anxiety effects in animals, and works by changing the expression of GABA receptors in the brain. These changes are mediated by the vagus nerve, which connects the brain and gut. When this nerve is severed no effect on anxiety or on GABA receptors is seen following psychobiotic treatment with L. rhamnosus. L. rhamnosus has also been shown to alleviate OCD-like behaviours in mice. Interestingly, this bacterium not only alters GABA receptors in the brain but has been shown to synthesise and release GABA. Other evidence supports the view that gut bacteria may influence the brain in routes other than the vagus nerve – by altering the immune system and via the manufacture of short-chain fatty acids, for example. snip http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22129530.400-psychobiotics-how-gut-bacteria-mess-with-your-mind.html?full=true#.UuVkauzTmvF
  3. Brain scans link concern for justice with reason, not emotion March 28, 2014 Jann Ingmire "(Medical Xpress)—People who care about justice are swayed more by reason than emotion, according to new brain scan research from the Department of Psychology and Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience. Neuroscience research demonstrates that the brain regions underpinning moral judgment share resources with circuits controlling other capacities such as emotional saliency, mental state understanding and decision-making. Credit: Jean Decety Psychologists have found that some individuals react more strongly than others to situations that invoke a sense of justice—for example, seeing a person being treated unfairly or mercifully. The new study used brain scans to analyze the thought processes of people with high "justice sensitivity." "We were interested to examine how individual differences about justice and fairness are represented in the brain to better understand the contribution of emotion and cognition in moral judgment," explained lead author Jean Decety, the Irving B. Harris Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry. Using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain-scanning device, the team studied what happened in the participants' brains as they judged videos depicting behavior that was morally good or bad. For example, they saw a person put money in a beggar's cup or kick the beggar's cup away. The participants were asked to rate on a scale how much they would blame or praise the actor seen in the video. People in the study also completed questionnaires that assessed cognitive and emotional empathy, as well as their justice sensitivity." snip http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-brain-scans-link-justice-emotion.html
  4. And What They Found Was Amazing Jennifer Welsh March 7, 2014 "It may sound like the plot of the Twilight Zone, but a psychology graduate student at the University of Ottawa says she can voluntarily enter an out-of-body experience. This was a lucky break for scientists, who were able to scan her brain during the episode. Usually out-of-body experiences are a part of, say, a near-death experience. A patient may float above their own body as surgeons work on them. These experiences are usually attributed to the drugs in a patient's system, or the hormones released into their system by trauma. A unique experience The study — which only involved this one person — was published Feb. 10 in the journal Frontiers of Human Neuroscience, a peer-reviewed open access publication. The researchers are members of the School Of Psychology at the University of Ottawa. According to the paper, this woman enters her out-of-body state right before sleeping, visualizing herself from above. She started doing so during naptime in preschool, they write. She currently only does it sometimes. The researchers wrote in the paper: She was able to see herself rotating in the air above her body, lying flat, and rolling along with the horizontal plane. She reported sometimes watching herself move from above but remained aware of her unmoving "real" body... She told the researchers: I feel myself moving, or, more accurately, can make myself feel as if I am moving. I know perfectly well that I am not actually moving. There is no duality of body and mind when this happens, not really. In fact, I am hyper-sensitive to my body at that point, because I am concentrating so hard on the sensation of moving. I am the one moving – me – my body. For example, if I ‘spin’ for long enough, I get dizzy. I do not see myself above my body. Rather, my whole body has moved up. I feel it as being above where I know it actually is. I usually also picture myself as moving up in my mind’s eye, but the mind is not substantive. It does not move unless the body does. The brain out of the body The researchers did a fMRI before and after asking her to enter her out-of-body state to find out what that looked like in the brain. They compared these to when she was imagining, but not actually entering, the state. Interestingly, the pathway that seemed to be activated during her out-of-body experience is also involved in the mental representation of movements." Andra M. Smith and Claude Messier "Brain regions activated by the out-of-body experience include the supplementary motor area, the cerebellum, the supramarginal gyrus, the inferior temporal gyrus, the middle and superior orbitofrontal gyri. Some parts of her brain involved in interpreting vision were turned down in activity, as shown below: Andra M. Smith and Claude Messier snip more images and info at link http://finance.yahoo.com/news/scientists-scanned-womans-brain-during-232752794.html The Study Voluntary out-of-body experience: an fMRI study Andra M. Smith and Claude Messier School of Psychology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada http://journal.frontiersin.org/Journal/10.3389/fnhum.2014.00070/full
  5. By Edwin Kee on 01/30/2014 "Do you think that self-driving cars would one day be so popular, that there is no need for one to actually own a driving license any more? I guess a whole lot of it really depends on the situation, but one thing is for sure – cars do seem to be getting smarter and smarter in this day and age. In fact, a team of engineering students over in India who happen to be working on a project over at the Mount Zion College of Engineering and Technology have decided to develop a thought-controlled car. Yes sir, you can feel all smug as though you were Professor Xavier himself, as this small van has been transformed into a thought controlled vehicle using off the shelf parts. One of the most essential part of this particular ride would be the Emotiv EEG headset which would function as a controller. Needless to say, this is one concept that will take years of refinement before it is actually safe to be unleashed on our roads, considering how easily distracted we can get these days. Imagine driving using your brain when you start to think about work or a personal relationship issue that needs looking into – how will the car be able to know which part of your thought process is used for driving, and the other to head to the nearest flower shop to purchase a bunch of roses?" http://www.ubergizmo.com/2014/01/thought-controlled-car-drives-the-future/ there is a video at the link, and yes, they may have a lot of work ahead, but I cannot help thinking about BlueET, his Co-Evolution and the thought controlled cars they had. We are on the way to the future it would seem.
  6. You say lateral frontal pole, I say that little devil/angel that whispers in my ear John Walsh January 29, 2014 "Scientists at Oxford University have made a startling discovery: they’ve found a region of the brain that makes you wonder if you’ve done something wrong, and whether you’d have been well advised to do something better. There are several things that you should know about this region, which is inside your head, and the head of the lady sitting beside you on the Tube, and the heads of David Cameron and Lady Gaga and Rouge Dragon Pursuivant of the Royal College of Heralds. One, it's called the lateral frontal pole. Two, it's unique to humans - they ran tests on monkeys in the course of the research at Oxford and, nope, they don't have it. Three, it's the size of "a large Brussels sprout". And four, it's a leap beyond current scientific knowledge into realms that can only be described as spooky. We already knew (he says, hastily consulting his copy of Popular Science for Dimwits) that the brain can monitor decisions it has made. It tells itself: "I have chosen to follow this track in the forest and it's turning out to be a sunlit pathway/sodden jungle", but it registers no more nuanced reaction than that. What this newly discovered region does, however, is to identify other paths that it might have been better to take, and register what a dolt the brain feels for getting it wrong. snip The lateral frontal pole, in short, is like a spouse who is quick to inform you that you've blundered and bungled it when it would have been so easy to get it right. It's the kindly-but-firm voice of authority that tells you to go to your room and mull over what you've done, so you'll be sure not to do it again in future... Hang on. This isn't some minor breakthrough of cognitive neuroscience. This is about good and bad, right and wrong. This is about the brain's connection to morality. This means that the Oxford scientists, without apparently realising what they've done, have located the conscience. " snip http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/comment/you-say-lateral-frontal-pole-i-say-that-little-devilangel-that-whispers-in-my-ear-9094043.html and here all along I swore I could see that little devil sitting on my shoulder
  7. Miniature 'human brain' grown in laboratory"Miniature "human brains" have been grown in a lab in a feat scientists hope will transform the understanding of neurological disorders. The pea-sized structures reached the same level of development as in a nine-week-old foetus, but are incapable of thought." More at the Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-23863544