Blue ET

War on Drugs

52 posts in this topic

from the Jim Marrs web site some uplifting news

Jacob Sullum shares [3] this incredible story from a defense attorney in Kansas.

I had a jury trial this morning on level 3 possession with intent MJ, level 4 possession drug paraphernalia and level 10 no drug tax stamp. During voir dire, my almost all white, middle-class, middle-aged jury went into full rebellion against the prosecutor stating that they wouldn’t convict even if the client’s guilt was proven beyond a reasonable doubt — almost all of them! They felt marijuana should be legalized, what he does with it is his own business and that the jails are already full of people for this silly charge. Then, when the potential jurors found out that the State wanted him to pay taxes on illegal drugs, they went nuts. One woman from the back said how stupid this was and why are we even here wasting our time. A “suit” from the front said this was the most ridiculous thing he’d ever heard. The prosecutor ended up dismissing the case. Judge gave me a dismissal with prejudice. I’m still laughing my ass off over this one.  I have NEVER seen a full on mutiny by an entire jury pool before. Easiest win ever!

In so many ways, the drug war’s own exploding unpopularity is poised to become its downfall. Events like this aren’t the norm (yet), but the mere threat of insurrection in the courtroom is already an important check against prosecutorial overreach in the war on drugs (in case you were wondering why so many medical marijuana raids never lead to criminal charges).

As the polls continue to turn in favor of reform, the refusal of juries to convict marijuana offenders could quickly become a brutal burden for these drug war boneheads to bear. It’s about damn time.

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  Blue I believe we will see more of that as the collective mind surfaces in the populace.

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All I can say is Its about damn time...

No really I am overjoyed by this and hope to see it spread far and wide as the people wake up to the injustices and lies being spoon fed to them on a daily basis...thanks for the post BlueET!

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Here in Uruguay our President is about to legalize Cannabis in order to prevent consumers to go to marginal and dangerous hoods to buy it (many of them are respected professionals, actors, etc.), and also to avoid young people to be tempted by other substances sold in those places.

The State will grow the weed and sell it.

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Kansas?! KANSAS?!!!! You have no idea what Kansas is like - if that's the attitude in Kansas, the War on Some Drugs is OVER. The Drugs have won :P

Heh heh heh. I know if I ever got conscripted and made it onto a jury, if it was drug-related that's an automatic acquit from me.

They don't want you knowing this, but juries can override the laws on the books and give out any decision they want. Even one person who votes to acquit can result in a mistrial.

I dunno. The whole point of the 30th annual War on Drugs is to jail as many black people as they can, while making as much money in secret for black projects that can't ever go on the public books of the government.

I guess people went along with it for a while - the average white person in Murica is afraid of black people, but I guess the chaos from the drug war has spread to the point where they're just sick and tired of it - black people fear or not.

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The war on drugs is lost cause it focuses on the substance, instead of focusing on the reasons that make people consume. Look at rehab programs, after the addict leave the facilities, he returns to the reality that lead him to consume, so the problem always ends up being the substance instead of the problems that make people want to evade reality.

The problem is not the gun but the reason why the person pull the trigger.

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Excellent story and you can be sure that prosecutor will be very nervous if he ever decides to brave court with another similar case. I have never used drugs but am not against personal use of the 'weed' but personally I will stick to ciggies. (actually, 'weed' might be cheaper before long the way Roxon is going) Just a thought.

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they can execute at 18 and lock you up for life but your still not adult  enough to decide what you waNT to put into your self.where old enough to carry a weapon and kill if so ordered, but no mary jane,and why dose our brain have delta9 sites and other sites for cbd and all cannabinoide,.and where mad gaqngsters that eat baby's because we use a harb.i know i am preaching to the quire  but it should be repented as often as  we can. :P :P 8) 8) 8) 8) 8)

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If everyone would get educated on Jury Nullification, "we the people" can put a stop to all these unjust laws in a heartbeat.  Luckily, posters explaining Jury Nullification are being posted near courthouses in the U.S. so people can use their power to stop the Elitist agendas in the courts.

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It was never a race thing it was a money thing, why rebuild an industry more efficiently when you can make money off continuing a problem... The American way... There is no money in a cure

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It is a mix of racism and large corporations suppressing this amazing plant from seeing the light of day. I do think without the push from DuPont and others it would have made it to the forefront by now..

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In the wise words of comedian Katt Williams;

"Don’t give me that shit that weed’s a drug. It ain’t no motherfuckin’ drug. I’ve done the research. It’s just a plant. It just grows like that. And if you just happen to set it on fire… there are some effects... it's not a drug, drugs, you gotta do shit to, you gotta add water, baking soda, stir it a little, I mean I don't know the recipe, I'm just sayin'!... but weed, you don't gotta do nothin' to it, it just grows like that."
 
Also, when Bob Saget admited to sucking dick for coke he did add the question "have YOU sucked dick for marijuana?" in an attempt to point out that a large majority of pot smokers don't really act like druggo's (I think the smokers who smoke all day everyday are closer to drggo's but still not exactly the same)so imo, there is a wild discrepancy between pot and other drugs.
 
Donno if it should be legal and easy to get, but it should be decriminalized, seeing friends get busted for 7 grams of pot at a concert and having the "Drug diversion programme" smear across their records end up counting good, deserving and hard working people out of jobs and overseas travel, does make you realize how having a 'war' that makes a plant the enemy, is so insanely fucking stupid.
 
And life destroying for some.
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They just don't stop with the bullshit!!

 

Genetic Link Found Between Pot and Schizophrenia--

 

Genes that increase the risk of a person developing schizophrenia may also increase the chance they will use cannabis, researchers said on Tuesday after studying more than 1,000 users of the drug. The results chime with previous studies linking schizophrenia and cannabis, but suggest the association may be due to common genes and might not be a causal relationship where cannabis use leads to increased schizophrenia risk.

Cannabis is the most widely used illicit drug in the world, and its use is higher among people with schizophrenia than in the general population. "We know that cannabis increases the risk of schizophrenia. Our study certainly does not rule this out, but it suggests that there is likely to be an association in the other direction as well — that a pre-disposition to schizophrenia also increases your likelihood of cannabis use," said Robert Power, who led the study at the Institute of Psychiatry at King's College London.

 

http://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/genetic-link-found-between-pot-schizophrenia-n139576

 

Where is this leading??

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Correlation != Causation. I dunno, pot has been legal in CO and WA for more than a year now and both places seem to be doing Ok. Nederland has let people smoke pot unmolested for how many decades now and they seem to do just fine year in, year out.

 

Sky hasn't fallen, world's about the same as it was before. I guess less beer is being drunk and more late night food is being eaten, but I think the economy can take that in stride fairly easily.

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CGI's StormyOne: Native American Church Fights For Right To Use Cannabis & Peyote

 

Posted By: Susoni [Send E-Mail]
Date: Sunday, 7-Feb-2016 16:37:22

 

 

From CGI's StormyOne:

CGI is RMN's readers forum where StormyOne is a member.

 

 

 

Native American Church Fights For Right To Use Cannabis & Peyote.

 

The owners of a marijuana dispensary raided last month in ‘the OC’, the California county known as Orange, now say the premises was becoming a church that uses cannabis as part of its ceremonies.

Attorney Matthew Pappas said the Oklevueha Native American Church was in the process of turning the location in Costa Mesa into a branch of one of its 200 chapters nationwide.

 

Despite California’s medicinal marijuana law, Costa Mesa prohibits sales in the city, but Pappas claims federal religious freedom laws allow the church to use cannabis as well as the psychoactive cactus peyote, ayahuasca, or "any other plant-based entheogen", according to Bia Labate.

 

An officer who took part in the raid on January 27 told the LA Times that "there was no indication that it was acting as anything other than a marijuana dispensary.”

 

City spokesman Tony Dodero said police found two large safes containing marijuana products and $6,000 in cash at the premises.

 

According to Dodero, several patients came to the door while police were inside. Five suspects were arrested on suspicion of distributing marijuana.

 

Pappas claims the church has been renting
locations
where marijuana dispensaries have operated in the past due to their understanding landlords.

 

The transition that was underway led to the misunderstanding, according to Pappas, and it is not yet known if charges will be brought against those arrested.

 

The church was founded by James Mooney after he had a falling out with the Native American Church over his desire to allow white residents of Salt Lake City to attend.

 

Mooney left the church and founded the Oklevueha Native American Church, inviting members without Native American heritage to attend.

 

A Utah branch was raided in 2000 and Mooney was convicted of “possessing and distributing peyote.”

 

However, the state’s supreme court reversed the decision saying he was exempt because he used "peyote in bona fide religious ceremonies."

 

The church filed a federal lawsuit against Sonoma County last November after sheriff’s deputies raided a branch and destroyed marijuana plants, violating their religious rights, according to Pappas.

 

James Mooney Oklevueha Native American Church ONAC

James Warren "Flaming Eagle" Mooney

 

talks about what people need to do to join the Oklevueha Native American Church ONAC and what does the money go to to when people contribute to the church and receive their membership cards.

The Native American Church uses indigenous build up rehabilitative programs and heal the people. Many of them are centered around the use of the sacrament Peyote. In the Native American culture ALL plants are sacred.

 

James "Flaming Eagle" is a Seminole Medicine Man who's Tribe still resides on the Oklevueha River in Orange Springs Florida. The word 'Oklevueha' means "unstoppable river".

Video:
http://the-drug-war-is-over.org

James Warren "Flaming Eagle" Mooney

 

talks about what people need to do to join the Oklevueha Native American Church ONAC and what does the money go to to when people contribute to the church and receive their membership cards. The Native American Church uses indigenous build up rehabilitative programs and heal the people. Many of them are centered around the use of the sacrament Peyote. In the Native American culture ALL plants are sacred.

 

James "Flaming Eagle" is a Seminole Medicine Man who's Tribe still resides on the Oklevueha River in Orange Springs Florida. The word 'Oklevueha' means "unstoppable river".

Source:
https://www.rt.com/usa/331656-native-american-church-cannabis/

Source
http://www.rumormillnews.com/cgi-bin/forum.cgi?read=39530

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DEA Blames the Media for Making It Harder to Arrest People over Weed

December 13, 2016   |   Carey Wedler

Source:  theantimedia.org

 

According to the DEA, the problem with cannabis in the United States isn’t that it’s still designated a dangerous drug with no medicinal value in spite of volumes of emerging scientific research indicating otherwise.

The problem is actually that the media has made it difficult for government agents to arrest people for selling and consuming it. The DEA also blames the increasing trend of legalization across the United States. In its 2016 National Drug Threat Assessment Summary [pdf], the DEA observes that “While marijuana remains illegal under federal law, many states have passed laws allowing the cultivation, possession, and use of marijuana within their respective states.”

The agency then argues:

“Due to these varying state laws, as well as an abundance of media attention surrounding claims of possible medical benefits, the general public has been introduced to contradictory and often inaccurate information regarding the legality and benefits of marijuana use.”
As a result, they contend: “This has made enforcement and prosecution for marijuana-related offenses more difficult, especially in states that have approved marijuana legalization.

Indeed, the DEA is correct in asserting an increasing number of individuals in states across the country have opted to remove barriers to cannabis use. From California to Colorado and Oregon to Washington D.C., 28 states have legalized either medical or recreational use.

But the agency’s wording that “an abundance of media attention surrounding claims of possible medical benefits” actually reveals the disingenuousness of its comments. Though the DEA frames the medicinal qualities of cannabis as doubtful, using uncertain terms like “claims” and “possible,” its own policies prove its statements “contradictory.”

In 2015, the DEA itself requested increased amounts of cannabis to be used for research to determine whether or not the plant can be used to treat health conditions. Though this does not necessarily prove there are benefits, it shows even the nation’s “authority” on drugs is adapting to the new era of ending cannabis prohibition and can no longer blindly deny the plant’s potStill, in spite of its limited efforts to allow cannabis for research purposes, a study published in the peer-reviewed PLOS Biology journal highlighted the barriers government drug policies’ pose to research:

“In the United States, city and state governments often move to outlaw novel drugs before the federal government believes it has sufficient evidence to make that determination. Some have been extreme in their lack of understanding of pharmacology.”

This represents a self-repeating loop whereby government policy restricts research, and the DEA then implies research is insufficient to prove medical benefits.

Regardless, though the DEA decided to keep cannabis a harmful “Schedule 1” drug in August, other branches of the government might disagree with its assessment. According to www.cancer.gov, a website run by the National Institute for Cancer, cannabis holds many potential benefits for treating nausea, vomiting, pain, anxiety, and loss of appetite.

While, again, “potential” is a key qualifier, the same fact sheet acknowledges that “Two cannabinoids (dronabinol and nabilone) are drugs approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the prevention or treatment of chemotherapy-related nausea and vomiting.” The same page notes “[a]nother active cannabinoid is cannabidiol (CBD), which may relieve pain, lower inflammation, and decrease anxiety.”

If we are to accept the authority of the DEA as a federal agency, we must also accept the authority of the FDA. But it appears the DEA’s claims about “claims” regarding marijuana are contradictory in the face of other government organizations’ opinions, as well as the opinions of medical experts who condemn drug war tactics.

In another example, the United States government has held a patent on marijuana for its antioxidant properties since 1979.

Still, the DEA blames the media for highlighting the benefits of marijuana, even as many stories about the potential benefits of cannabis are rooted in ongoing discoveries made through scientific research — a factor the DEA fails to acknowledge in its criticism of the media.
Further, even absent any scientific data on the plant, anecdotal evidence of cannabis shows just how much it is helping people in need. These are not “claims,” as the DEA suggests.

A recent video of a former cop with debilitating Parkinson’s disease showed how just a few drops of cannabis oil helped calm his uncontrolled movements and relieve his pain, and available medical research backs up his experience. Epileptic children enjoy relief from severe seizures, and preliminary medical research also supports their experiences. Countless cancer patients testify to the immense benefits cannabis brings them, especially when it comes to mitigating the effects of chemotherapy. One man who suffered from staggering cluster headaches as a result of the nation’s biggest natural gas leak in history found relief from cannabidiol (CBD) oil after trying numerous other treatments with no success. Of his experience, endocannabinoid researcher, Dr. Saoirse O’Sullivan of the University of Nottingham’s medical school, observed:

“The thing about CBD is that because it has so many facets, so many ways in which it acts, that probably, the response was a combination of a little bit of all of them. [It was ] probably not just one thing — and that’s what makes it such a rich drug.”

Just last night, the author of this article was suffering from a migraine so severe she couldn’t keep food down, yet with a few drops of non-psychoactive CBD oil, the pain and nausea disappeared.

Instead of blaming states and media outlets — and by extension, academic researchers — for evolving past the drug war mentality, the DEA would do well to examine its own practices.

Is it possible people are beginning to see the absurdity of sending men with guns to forcibly arrest individuals who consume an ancient plant humans have used for thousands of years? Could it be that people are finally beginning to see the cracks in decades of propaganda against cannabis?

Though more research is undoubtedly needed to determine the exact medical benefits of marijuana, the same argument could be made for dangerous pharmaceutical drugs approved by the FDA based on research conducted by their manufacturers. As the FDA notes, “It is the responsibility of the company seeking to market a drug to test it and submit evidence that it is safe and effective.”

While it’s important not to paint the plant as a cure-all for any ailment — and research that finds drawbacks of marijuana use must also be further investigated — the DEA’s comments on cannabis do little more than affirm that its policies are outdated, its mentality is increasingly obsolete, and that it’s digging its heels into the aging, prohibition paradigm, even as the rest of the country moves on.

Link:  http://theantimedia.org/dea-blames-media-weed/

 

This article (DEA Blames the Media for Making It Harder to Arrest People over Weed) is free and open source. You have permission to republish this article under a Creative Commons license with attribution to Carey Wedler and theAntiMedia.orgential.

 

 

 

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Drug Overdoses Now Kill More Americans Than Guns: What You’re Not Being Told

December 13, 2016   |   Alice Salles

Source:  theantimedia.org

 

In 2015, more than 50,000 Americans died from drug overdoses. This is a staggering number, especially when compared to traffic accidents, which claimed 37,757 lives in the same year. Drug overdose deaths also outpaced the 36,252 people who died due to gun-related injuries in 2015.

This data comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the analysis was conducted by reporters with access to the database. According to the findings, “Heroin deaths rose 23 percent in one year, to 12,989,” while “[a]buse of drugs like Oxycontin and Vicodin killed 17,536,” CBS reports.

The high rate of overdose-related deaths has largely been attributed to heroin and prescription painkiller abuse. Heroin is an illicit drug, and law enforcement efforts to crack down on its use have increased in recent years, with the National Seizure System confirming there has been an “80 percent increase in heroin seizures in the past five years.”

Despite increased scrutiny and efforts to combat addiction, heroin abuse leading to death was not the only type of fatal drug overdose to increase in 2015. Deaths from illicit fentanyl rose 73 percent, prompting many to question how effective current prohibitionist drug policies are. Despite the popular belief that tougher enforcement equals less drug abuse, the real world consequences of the drug war appear to prove the opposite. With an annual budget of over $2.8 billion, the Drug Enforcement Administration is not getting its money’s worth.

Enforcement-Driven Drug Abuse and Its Impact on Life Expectancy

According to the data provided by the WONDER Online Database, eight common causes of death saw an increase in 2015, leading to a drop in the nation’s life expectancy rate. For the first time in 20 years, Americans are, on average, likely to live 78.8 years, “a decrease of one-tenth of a year,” CBS notes in another article.

Some of the areas most affected by increased drug abuse include Pennsylvania, Michigan, Ohio, New Jersey, New York, and coastal New England. According to the analysis, “counties in the Midwest, California, and Texas saw little to no change in drug overdose deaths during this period.”

We recently learned that in states where medical marijuana is legal, reliance on prescription painkillers is curtailed significantly. According to one study, opioid overdose deaths have also dropped in states with legal access to cannabis.

In the case of California, the legalization of medical marijuana may have helped keep the rate of drug abuse down. In states like Texas, the “tough on crime” mentality has been suffering major legal blows ever since 2007, when legislation created “an alternative to perpetually feeding money into prison construction to warehouse non-violent offenders,” the Washington Post reported in 2014.

The effort eventually “made it easier for former prisoners to reintegrate into society after release by making it less likely their employers would know about or act on their criminal records.” This was because the new law gave specialized drug courts more power over these cases while revamping parole, so violations could be punished swiftly “without automatically sending people back to jail for long terms.” While imperfect, the small reforms the Texas legislature instituted helped to spark a movement that continues to grow. With the increased number of states riding the legalization wave, the rates of drug abuse in locations where weed is legal could very well drop.

Why the Drug War Leads to More Abuse

With the drug market involving so many illicit components, providers have few, if any, incentives to produce quality drugs. Because addicts are often unable to obtain help legally and fear being hammered by drug laws, they frequently run to the shadows, allowing the abuse to go unchecked.

With the federal government cracking down on legal opioids, as well, people suffering from pain and trauma are beginning to turn to the black market for their drug needs, which also invites abuse.

In places like Canada, addicts are being given the opportunity to obtain treatment without having to face stringent legal consequences. Even some police departments across the United States are adopting a similar non-punitive approach. While these solutions are not a panacea, they are a start.

But until the drug market is finally freed — and the sale and use of drugs are no longer seen as criminal acts — abuse will continue to grow. Unless, of course, drug law enforcement suffers a blow thanks to the ongoing movement to help states retrieve their power to say no to the federal government.

Link:  http://theantimedia.org/drug-overdoses-kill-guns/

 

This article (Drug Overdoses Now Kill More Americans Than Guns: What You’re Not Being Told) is free and open source. You have permission to republish this article under a Creative Commons license with attribution to Alice Salles and theAntiMedia.org

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$60mn drug bust: 'Largest known seizure of heroin' in Afghanistan revealed by DEA

15 Dec, 2016

Source:  Russia Today

 

A massive 20 tons of drugs with a “conservative” street value of about $60 million were seized from a “super lab” run by suspected Taliban connected trafficking network, the US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has revealed.
The biggest-ever seizure of heroin in Afghanistan “if not the world” which took place last October in a joint operation between the DEA, American Special Forces and Afghanistan's Sensitive Investigative Unit and National Interdiction Unit.

The haul included 129 kilograms of crystal heroin, 6.4 tons of heroin base, 134 kilograms of opium, 12.5 tons of morphine base and 12 kilograms of hashish.

Snip

Link:  https://www.rt.com/usa/370460-largest-drug-bust-afghanistan-dea/

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Happy haul: Dutch police seize ingredients enough to make 1 bn ecstasy pills

10 Feb, 2017

Source:  Russia Today

Link:  https://www.rt.com/news/376892-dutch-police-billion-ecstasy-pills/

 

Dutch police have seized materials that could make as many as 1 billion ecstasy pills in a stolen truck near the Belgian border on Thursday. Three men were arrested at the scene.

Snip

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Brazil Supreme Court judge calls for drugs legalization to beat gangs

Alonso Soto       Feb. 10, 2017

"BRASILIA (Reuters) - A Brazilian Supreme Court justice called on Friday for the legalization of marijuana and even cocaine to undo the growing power of drug gangs behind a wave of violence that has shaken Latin America's largest country.

Justice Roberto Barroso, a Yale graduate and constitutional law professor, said 50 years of war against drugs had failed miserably, clogging jails with small-time dealers and fueling a violent gang battle for control of the lucrative trade.

"Unlike the United States and Europe where the problem lies in the impact drugs have on consumers, in Brazil the problem lies in the power drug traffickers have over poor communities," Barroso told Reuters in the court's modern glass building in Brasilia.

"I can assure you it is only a matter of time. Either we legalize marijuana now or we do it in the future after we have spent billions and incarcerated thousands."

The rare appeal from a top judge in the deeply conservative country reflects rising fears about the violence plaguing Brazil's overcrowded prisons and city slums.

A New Year's day prison massacre in the jungle city of Manaus in which inmates from one drug gang decapitated dozens of rivals sparked jail riots across the country.

This week, a strike by police in Brazil's southeastern state of Espirito Santo unleashed a crime frenzy that killed more than 120 people - many of them linked to criminal gangs, according to police unions.

Regulating the production, sale and consumption of marijuana - as in Brazil's smaller neighbor Uruguay - could be first step in curbing crime in one of the world's most dangerous countries, Barroso said.

"If that works we can easily move to legalize cocaine," said Barroso, who as a lawyer pushed to legalize stem cell research and gay rights. "If you want to break the power of traffickers you need to consider legalizing cocaine."

In 2013, Uruguay become the first country in the world to legalize marijuana. Few countries have decriminalized the possession of cocaine, with experts divided over the practicality of legalizing one of the most addictive illegal drugs."

snip

https://www.yahoo.com/news/brazil-supreme-court-judge-calls-drugs-legalization-beat-190403997.html

maybe he has an idea with merit?  

 

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Personally, I don't think a whole civilisation of drug fu*ked kids and adults is going to be very successful at anything other than being easier to control.  Can you imagine every person being high on drugs legally every day of their lives.  Dr's, nurses, police and firemen for example all high and trying to do their jobs - I don't think that would be very effective somehow.

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