wildcard

Cyber-security 101 Information thread

360 posts in this topic

Totally, breezy!

And I also come to wonder this; maybe someone comes up with the command to utilise the whole lot of smartphones of people to start mining crypto currencies for themselves without the owners ever knowing about it.....as if lending your CPU to SETI for the background work.

If the capacity of smartphones become more and more powerful, this sorta stuff gotta be taken into the consideration for guarding us, methinks.

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DISCONNECT Alexa Right Now...

 

Alexa, you're naughty! Technology, ain't it grand?

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Google confirms external apps can scan your emails: here's how to check

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-07-04/google-admits-it-allows-external-apps-to-access-user-data/9938556

"Google has confirmed it allows some external software developers to read and analyse the inboxes of Gmail users, following scrutiny about privacy on the platform."

"If you want to take a look, navigate to "Google Account", which should be in the top-right section of your Gmail screen on desktop.

Once in your account, you can find the "Apps with account access" button under the sign-in and security section.

On this page, you can see which apps have access to your account, as well as apps and sites where you use your Google password to log in.

Click "Manage Apps", and you will see Google breaks apps into three categories:

  • Third-party apps with account access
  • Those you use your Google password to log in
  • Google apps that you have installed."

"Take a close look at the third-party apps, and what information they collect — some may access your Google contacts, while others might access Google Drive.

If you click on any of these apps, a dropdown box will offer more detail about the type of data it can collect.

Click "remove access" to get rid of any you don't like the look of, or don't use regularly."

 

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Computer Virus Cripples IPhone Chipmaker TSMC Plants

Debbie Wu          August 4, 2018

"(Bloomberg) -- A computer virus halted several Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. factories Friday night, dealing the company one of its most severe disruptions as it ramps up chipmaking for Apple Inc.’s next iPhones.

The sole maker of the iPhone’s main processor said a number of its fabrication tools had been infected, and while it had contained the problem and resumed some production, several of its factories won’t restart till at least Sunday. The virus wasn’t introduced by a hacker, the company added in a statement.

It’s unclear who targeted TSMC, the world’s biggest contract manufacturer of chips for companies including Apple and Qualcomm Inc. It’s the first time a virus had ever brought down a TSMC facility, recalling the WannaCry cyberattacks of 2017 that forced corporations around the world to suspend operations as they rooted out the ransomware. TSMC is working on solutions now but said the degree of infection varied from factory to factory, and that it will provide more information Monday after it’s assessed the situation.

“TSMC has been attacked by viruses before, but this is the first time a virus attack has affected our production lines,” Chief Financial Officer Lora Ho told Bloomberg News by phone. She wouldn’t talk about how much revenue it would lose as a result of the disruption, or whether the facilities affected were involved in making iPhone chips."

snip

https://www.bloombergquint.com/technology/2018/08/04/tsmc-takes-emergency-steps-as-operations-hit-by-computer-virus#gs.XAwJ0PM

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Mozilla, You Too......

Mozilla / Firefox goes all in for EVIL… pushes corporate news collusion to silence independent media

Wednesday, August 15, 2018 by: Mike Adams

https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-08-15-mozilla-firefox-goes-all-in-for-evil-pushes-corporate-news-collusion-to-silence-independent-media.html

These are suggested by Mike in the article to substitute Mozilla products:

"BRAVE – Run by a pro-freedom group that supports small, independent publishers (and even has a mechanism for micropayments)."

https://brave.com/

"Vivaldi – Run by a small, independent group with no ties to deep state funding or the NSA."

https://vivaldi.com/

I appreciated to learn about Vivaldi, considering they got webmail system, BUT I think there's a concern that it's a Norway based company. Another strong hold of the Cs. So even if they want to do the right thing, maybe it's easy for the Cs to crack into their system.

It's an obscure concern. But please have it at the back of your head. So far I like what they do, I found.

 

The thing about such worry is that I can count on some of us always monitoring them, like Mike Adams, and if something goes wrong, those people would be pointing out like how he did this time round.

And there'd be more of us standing up and creating fresh portals, regardless of the advancements made by nasty bunch of controllers, so for them, it'd be like a cat and mouse chase. We will win, as long as we don't become stagnate and get hooked to the badly infiltrated systems, methinks.

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T-Mobile Says Hackers Stole Customer's Data in Data Breach

August 24, 2018          Zack Whittaker

 

"T-Mobile  has confirmed hackers breached its systems.

The cell giant, currently merging with Sprint, said in a statement that hackers customer stole names, billing zip codes, phone numbers, email addresses, account numbers, and account type — such as if an account was prepaid or postpaid — in what the company described as an “unauthorized capture of data.”

No customer financial or billing data was compromised, the company said.

It’s not known when the breach occurred but the unauthorized access was detected and shut down on Monday.

A T-Mobile spokesperson told TechCrunch that the breach was “discovered and stopped very quickly,” and “affected a small number” of customers. But Motherboard reported that a spokesperson said about 3 percent of the company’s 77 million users were affected — some 2 million accounts.

T-Mobile began notifying customers of the breach Friday morning with a text message sent to affected accounts. But that drew ire from some, who said the shortlink in the text message looked like phishing."

snip

https://techcrunch.com/2018/08/24/t-mobile-says-hackers-stole-customer-data-in-data-breach/

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Health care data hacks are on the rise

Sept. 26, 2018     Sam Baker

snip       image of chart

 

"More than 175 million health care records have been breached since 2010, and they’re getting more vulnerable every year, according to a new analysis published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

By the numbers: The total number of breaches is increasing — from 99 in 2010 to 344 in 2017. 

Doctors and hospitals are breached most frequently, but insurers’ breaches expose the most individual records.


Data breaches that affect more than 500 people have to be reported to the federal government. There have been more than 2,100 of them since 2010.

Between the lines: A handful of high-profile hacks against large insurance companies in 2015 seem to have been especially damaging.

The cumulative number of records exposed from doctors and hospitals has risen steadily every year. The total number that came from insurance companies, however, skyrocketed in 2015 — then leveled off.
Similarly, the total number of records exposed through hacking (as opposed to other types of breaches) jumped from about 3 million in 2014 to 115 million in 2015. It is still climbing.
2015 saw several big health care hacks, including a historic breach of Anthem’s records."

https://www.axios.com/health-care-data-privacy-hacking-9fff9d57-789b-481c-a4bb-03609f2307c5.html

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The Big Hack: How China Used a Tiny Chip to Infiltrate U.S. Companies

Oct. 4, 2018   Jordon Robertson and Michael Riley

"The attack by Chinese spies reached almost 30 U.S. companies, including Amazon and Apple, by compromising America’s technology supply chain, according to extensive interviews with government and corporate sources.


In 2015, Amazon.com Inc. began quietly evaluating a startup called Elemental Technologies, a potential acquisition to help with a major expansion of its streaming video service, known today as Amazon Prime Video. Based in Portland, Ore., Elemental made software for compressing massive video files and formatting them for different devices. Its technology had helped stream the Olympic Games online, communicate with the International Space Station, and funnel drone footage to the Central Intelligence Agency. Elemental’s national security contracts weren’t the main reason for the proposed acquisition, but they fit nicely with Amazon’s government businesses, such as the highly secure cloud that Amazon Web Services (AWS) was building for the CIA.

To help with due diligence, AWS, which was overseeing the prospective acquisition, hired a third-party company to scrutinize Elemental’s security, according to one person familiar with the process. The first pass uncovered troubling issues, prompting AWS to take a closer look at Elemental’s main product: the expensive servers that customers installed in their networks to handle the video compression. These servers were assembled for Elemental by Super Micro Computer Inc., a San Jose-based company (commonly known as Supermicro) that’s also one of the world’s biggest suppliers of server motherboards, the fiberglass-mounted clusters of chips and capacitors that act as the neurons of data centers large and small. In late spring of 2015, Elemental’s staff boxed up several servers and sent them to Ontario, Canada, for the third-party security company to test, the person says.

Nested on the servers’ motherboards, the testers found a tiny microchip, not much bigger than a grain of rice, that wasn’t part of the boards’ original design. Amazon reported the discovery to U.S. authorities, sending a shudder through the intelligence community. Elemental’s servers could be found in Department of Defense data centers, the CIA’s drone operations, and the onboard networks of Navy warships. And Elemental was just one of hundreds of Supermicro customers."
snip

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2018-10-04/the-big-hack-how-china-used-a-tiny-chip-to-infiltrate-america-s-top-companies

 

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Privacy Aware Search Engine: duckduckgo.com 

ixquick.com is now StartPage that's deeply tied with Goggle.

Now we only got duckduckgo.com for privacy.

If you know any other search engines that are decent and protective of privacy, please drop the post here.

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