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Icanseeatoms

FIRE SKY AURORA

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post-1624-0-74133500-1386195330_thumb.pnhttp://spaceweather.com/

 

http://spaceweathergallery.com/full_image.php?image_name=Paula-Phillips-Shadybrook-Thanksgiving-Sunset-2013-001_1385764598.jpg&PHPSESSID=9oqj6ks2pl96cfakdd3a9531a0

 

Unique capture Paula Phillips  ;)

 

Almost everyday we see things we have never seen before, this thread and many others like it show how we really do live on a beautiful Earth in so many ways.

 

Love it !  :D

 

Icanseeatoms.

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2521901/Forget-Big-Bang--Rainbow-Gravity-theory-suggests-universe-NO-beginning-stretches-infinitely.html

 

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=rainbow-gravity-universe-beginning&page=2

 

Forget the Big Bang - 'Rainbow Gravity' theory suggests our universe has NO beginning and stretches out infinitely 
  • Claims that gravity's effect is felt differently by various wavelengths of light
  • Current belief is light will follow the same set path regardless of frequency
  • If theory is correct, it means that our universe stretches back into time infinitely with no singular point where it started

By ELLIE ZOLFAGHARIFARD

PUBLISHED: 12:19, 11 December 2013 UPDATED: 13:04, 11 December 2013

 

The idea is one possible result of something known as ‘rainbow gravity’- a theory that is not widely accepted among physicists, though many say the idea is interesting.

 

The theory’s name comes from a suggestion that gravity's effect on the cosmos is felt differently by varying wavelengths of light, which can be found in the colours of the rainbow
 

Researchers claim it highlights flaws in the Big Bang theory, which suggests the universe was born about 13.8 billion years ago when an infinitely dense point - known as a 'singularity' - exploded
 

THE THEORY OF RAINBOW GRAVITY

The Rainbow Gravity theory suggests that  gravity's effect on the cosmos causes  different wavelengths of light to behave differently.

This means that particles with different energies will move in space-times and gravitational fields differently.

The theory was proposed 10 years ago in an attempt to reconcile difference between the theories of general relativity and quantum mechanics.

One consequence of rainbow gravity is that our universe stretches back into time infinitely with no singular point where it started.

 

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This is what main stream science would have you believe, hahaha i like the fact they always backdate their ' new discoveries ' 10 years indeed LoL.  Accordingly the publish date was 2009

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Posting for friends ;  http://bullatherainbowman.blogspot.co.uk/2013_12_01_archive.html   ;)

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http://spaceweathergallery.com/aurora_gallery.html

 

Icanseeatoms.   :D

 

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Ah the prismatic eye is gaining wider understanding in the world or high science. :D 

This is how I came to beging to understand LIGHT.

 

Dwelling on the idea of the "Rainbow Warriors" story of native american Indians, I realised what it meant was "We are Children of this spectrum".

 

When I came to day dream into the idea of the prismatic eye, that which creates light emits light, I then began to understand that LIGHT gives structure to universe, LIGHT has no speed because LIGHT does not move. 

 

Keeping in-mind the Rainbow is split from pure LIGHT as demonstrated by the prism.

 

So when I saw the title, "Rainbow Gravity" my heart lit up! Which leads me to point out in case you had no clue, Chakras have colours matching the spectrum, CHAKRAS.png
 

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Auroras in Abisko National Park February 1st, 2014

.

 

???

:wtf:

Icanseeatoms.   :firecracker1: 

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Bright aurora in moonlight

 

The moon was up when Mike Taylor captured this photo of the aurora borealis, or northern lights. The foreground lighting is moonlight.

 

Mike Taylor captured this photo of the aurora borealis, or northern lights, on the night of February 18-19, when strong auroras were visible farther south than usual. Mike wrote:

 

The spikes of the northern lights were quite strong when I first headed out see what I could capture close to my home in central Maine on the morning of February 19. The cloud cover quickly moved out but then came back after about a half hour. I almost missed the show! This was one of my test shots to check my camera settings and composition. The moon was very bright and washed out a lot of the sky and the aurora but made for some nice foreground lighting.

Nikon D600 & 14-24mm @ 14mm
f/2.8 – 20 secs – ISO 800 – WB Kelvin 3570
02/19/14 – 2:56 AM
Processed through Lightroom 5 & Photoshop CS5

 

 

Absolutely, stunningly, beautiful

Moonlight-Aurora-II-Mike-Taylor-2-19-201

Mike Taylor calls this photo Moonlight Aurora II. He captured it on February 19, 2014

 

 

http://earthsky.org/todays-image/bright-aurora-in-moonlight

 

 

 

 

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Northern Lights illuminate the UK

 

The Aurora Borealis - better known as the Northern Lights - has been giving rare and spectacular displays over parts of the UK, from the north of Scotland to as far south as Essex and Gloucestershire.

 

27 February 2014    Last updated at 17:36 ET

 

The lights have also been clearly visible in places such as Orkney, Norfolk, and south Wales.

 

post-2154-0-41092600-1393541142_thumb.pn

 

The display, which is caused by electronically charged particles from the sun entering the earth's atmosphere, has been seen as far south as Foxley, in Norfolk.

 

post-2154-0-05013400-1393541159_thumb.pn

 

Mark Thompson, presenter of BBC's Stargazing Live, who took this picture in Norfolk, said he was not expecting the display to be so spectacular.

 

post-2154-0-27762900-1393541177_thumb.pn

 

Mr Thompson said the display, which was also seen in Gloucestershire, happens when solar wind, or electronically charged particles, are ejected from the sun. He said: "They take two or three days to get here and when they do get here they cause the gas atoms in the sky to glow. It is as simple as that."

 

post-2154-0-90748800-1393541193_thumb.pn

 

The astronomer said: "Three or four days ago the sun will have thrown a lot of this stuff out in an event called a Coronal Mass Ejection, and they would have been travelling towards the earth since. It all depends how active the sun has been." This photograph was taken in Nethybridge, in the Highlands of Scotland.

 

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-26378027

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CME IMPACT TRIGGERS GEOMAGNETIC STORM: A G1-class geomagnetic storm is in progress following the glancing impact of a CME on Feb. 27th at 1645 UT. Sky watchers in Europe are reporting bright auroras. Ruslans Merzlakovs sends this picture from Nykøbing Mors, Denmark

 

denmark_strip.jpg

 

"A very bright aurora splashed in the afternoon sky at 9 P.M. Danish time," says Merzlakovs. "This picture is a 30 second exposure at ISO 1600."

NOAA forecasters expect CME effects to last for as much as 24 hours. As night falls across North America, auroras could appear in northern-tier US states from Maine to Washington as well as Canada. Local midnight is usually the best time to look."

http://spaceweather.com/

 

 

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 Mitch Battros-Earth Changes Media  February 28th, 2014


Aviation, along with the nations power grid alliance has been put on alert due to a series of geomagnetic storms hitting the Earth's magnetic field. Area of impact is primarily from 55 degrees parallel northwards.


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http://spaceweather.com/

 

WEAK INTERPLANETARY SHOCK SPARKS AURORAS: An interplanetary shock wave, origin unknown, hit Earth's magnetic field during the late hours of May 7th. Although the weak impact did not spark a geomagnetic storm, solar wind conditions in the wake of the shock have been favorable for auroras. Nancy Dean took this picture last night on Mount Spur, Alaska:

alaska_strip.jpg

"The sunset was still showing strong on May 8th when the Northern Lights came out to dance across the Alaskan sky," says Dean.

As northern spring unfolds, persistent twilight is spreading into the night skies of Alaska. It takes a bright display of auroras to be seen against such a backdrop. Dean's photo is evidence that a weak shock does not necessarily produce weak auroras.

 

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Interesting note ;

 

An interplanetary shock wave, origin unknown !

 

Weak impact on Earths Magnetic Field !

 

During Twilight !

 

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Now we have all seen the most beautiful colours at sunset & sunrise & twilight.

 

Pastel colours of which this pens eyes are seeing more and more of 

 

Interplanetary shock wave = CosmoSonicBoom  ??  Initial stages !

 

Enhanced Pastel Colours  = Colours we have never seen before, strikingly rich texture 

 

Where oh where have i recently read a report of us being able to see more colours

 

Searching

 

Cheers  ;D

 

Icanseeatoms.

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NOCTILUCENT CLOUDS: The Arctic Circle is beginning to glow--not with auroras, but with noctilucent clouds (NLCs). Seeded by meteor smoke, electric-blue NLCs appear every year in late spring, and grow in intensity as summer unfolds. Last night they descended to central Europe. Chris Kranich sends this picture from Kiel, Germany:

 

post-1624-0-27067500-1401546888_thumb.pn

 

http://spaceweathergallery.com/full_image.php?image_name=Chris-Kranich-IMG_5871-2_1401501133.jpg&PHPSESSID=bhdh3465ultfv31tfm0v440ck4

 

NASA's AIM spacecraft is orbiting Earth on a mission to study noctilucent clouds. When the spacecraft launched in 2007, the origin of the clouds was a mystery.  ( NASA sent up 4/5 AIM craft to purposely study AURORAS ) My Emphasis !!!!!!          Underlined

 

Observing tips: NLCs favor high latitudes, but they are not confined there. In recent years the clouds have been sighted as far south as Colorado and Virginia. Look west 30 to 60 minutes after sunset when the Sun has dipped 6o to 16o below the horizon. If you see luminous blue-white tendrils spreading across the sky, you may have spotted a noctilucent cloud.

http://spaceweather.com/

 

SUNSET SKY SHOW, CONTINUED: The crescent Moon and Jupiter are converging for a sunset sky show. When the sun goes down tonight, step outside and look for them beaming through the western twilight. The two bright bodies are less than 10o degrees apart

 

 

Cheers  ;D

 

Icanseeatoms.

 

 

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Purple Auroras

 

 "Over the weekend, the sky above Canada and many northern-tier US states turned purple. It was the aurora borealis, sparked by a CME impact during the late hours of June 7th. "Wonderful purple and blue auroras spanned the sky, peaking between 2 and 2:30 a.m. MDT on June 8th," reports Alan Dyer, who captured the colors outside an old barn in Alberta, Canada:

 

oldbarn_strip.jpg

 

In auroras, purple is a sign of nitrogen. While oxygen atoms produce the green glow in Dyer's image, the purple comes from molecular nitrogen ions at very high altitudes. For some reason, high-altitude nitrogen was unusually excited during this G2-class geomagnetic storm, and many people witnessed its telltale hue.

 

More purple could be in the offing. A solar wind stream following in the wake of the CME has kept Earth's magnetic field unsettled two full days after the CME's impact. Solar wind speeds are now greater than 500 km/s, prompting NOAA forecasters to boost the odds of a polar geomagnetic storm on June 9th to 50%."

http://spaceweather.com/

 

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Greatest light show on Earth: Stunning Real-Time Video Takes Viewers Inside Mesmeric Phenomenon of an Aurora Substorm

 

When the sky over Yellowknife, Canada, lit up one cold March night with a spectacular Northern Lights display, Korean photographer Kwon O Chul was on hand to record the breathtaking phenomenon in real time with his camera.

Chul, who describes himself as an astrophotographer, traveled to Canada's rugged Northern Territories south of the Arctic Circle in March 2013 to capture a celestial event known as an aurora substorm - a brief disturbance in the Earth's magnetosphere that causes energy to be released.

Aurora substorms are dramatic, fast-moving and short-lived.

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2770310/Greatest-light-Earth-Stunning-real-time-video-takes-viewers-inside-mesmeric-phenomenon-aurora-substorm.html

 

 

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Stunning !

 

Cheers Redster

 

Snakes that move like snakes makes big Rainbow in the Sky

 

Icanseeatoms.

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:wub:

 

post-2154-0-04675600-1412955043_thumb.jp

 

A full circle rainbow was featured as NASA's Astronomy Photo of the Day this week.(Photo: NASA/Colin Leonhardt, Birdseye View Photography)

 

 

http://www.azcentral.com/story/life/2014/10/03/full-circle-rainbow-featured-by-nasa/16681145/

 

COTTESLOE BEACH, Australia – Have you ever seen a full circle rainbow before?

Most people see rainbows from the ground, which makes them look like an arch. But when you see a rainbow from the air, you can see it's actually a full circle.

Earlier this week NASA posted this photo, taken over Cottesloe Beach, Australia, as the Astronomy Picture of the Day. The caption says it was taken from a helicopter that was flying between a downpour and a setting sun.

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First thought was-its a portal

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EMERALD DYNAMITE: On Oct. 18th, Earth passed through multiple folds in the heliospheric current sheet--a phenomenon known as "solar sector boundary crossings." This sparked a veritable explosion of bright auroras around the Arctic Circle. Ole Salomonsen of Tromso, Norway, captured the outburst in this photo, which he calls Emerald Dynamite:

 

dynamite_strip.jpg

"This is one of many spectacular auroral displays I captured tonight," says Salomonsen. "There were red auroras, green auroras, coronas, fast moving purple bands... It was the most amazing display I have witnessed in a long time."

 

http://www.spaceweather.com/

 

I think this has got to be one of the most beautiful aurora's I have ever seen a picture of. WOW !!

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Interesting that this one is located over the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) Operations Support Facility (OSF). Makes you wonder what other activity is going on up there. Also, Alma means soul. And I wonder why they call it ALMA as opposed to ALMSA. I will also say that some of the light sourcing in the pic don't make sense to me. *shrug* Anyway, just my random thoughts about this beautiful picture.

 

post-2154-0-35127900-1418758184_thumb.jp

 

https://www.eso.org/public/images/potw1450a/

 

 

The OSF is the base camp for the ALMA site, which is significantly higher at over 5000 metres up on the Chajnantor Plateau.

 

The OSF isn’t just a location for operating the giant ALMA Observatory; it is also where new technologies are assembled, integrated, and verified before they are transported to their final destination on Chajnantor.

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Thanks K, thats a new one for me, something for us to ponder over !

 

Cheers  ;D

 

Icanseeatoms.

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SOLAR WIND SPARKS AURORAS: A solar wind stream continues to gently buffet Earth's magnetic field. On Feb. 23-24, a G1-class geomagnetic storm broke out, causing an outburst of auroras around the Arctic Circle. At the peak of the disturbance, Northern Lights spilled across Canadian Border into upper-tier US states including WashingtonMontanaIdaho and, shown here, South Dakota:

 

southdakota_strip.jpg

 

"The lights were visible to the unaided eye and quite bright at times," says photographer Randy Halverson of Kennebec, SD.

The storm also sparked Southern Lights. New Zealand photographer Ian Griffin reports "an amazing night of auroras in Dunedin, Otago. We witnessed a display that lasted well over 4 hours with many pleasing beams and colors!" See his photos

More auroras could be in the offing. NOAA forecasters estimate a 35% chance of geomagnetic storms on Feb. 25 as the solar wind continues to blow."

http://spaceweather.com/

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post-2154-0-87041200-1429634859_thumb.jp

(Photo: Amanda Curtis)

 

(found on twitter)

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