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Icanseeatoms

FIRE SKY AURORA

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FIRE SKY AURORA

I dedicate this thread to the past thread i did under the title Aurora UK / Worldwide, that sadly got lost due to the attack we had at Chani in mid July 2012, and also to the upcoming CME event we shall be experiencing shortly that could well give us some absolutely stunning pictures of the Aurora Borealis ( Northern Hemisphere ) and the Aurora Australis ( Southern Hemisphere )

Please feel free to post your pictures/videos or even the links to sites you come across.

Updates welcome                        News stories welcome

I want to see the most beautiful mind boggling awe inspiring pictures of the natural phenomenon we call the AURORA.

Firstly i shall provide a link to Wikipedia where you can read all about the Aurora s

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurora_(astronomy)

Secondly i shall provide a few links for you to view at your pleasure:

http://aurorawatch.lancs.ac.uk/

http://aurorawatch.lancs.ac.uk/introduction

http://thelivingmoon.com/41pegasus/02files/Aurora_Borealis.html

http://thelivingmoon.com/41pegasus/02files/Aurora_Borealis_02.html

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/antz/antarctica-a-year-on-ice-documentary-feature-film

http://www.antarcticimages.com/

http://www.gi.alaska.edu/AuroraForecast

http://www.spacew.com/www/auroras.php

I hope those of you viewing this thread enjoy and hopefully contribute in which ever way suits you.

Thank you for visiting this thread:

Icanseeatoms.

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Photographer captures rare 'fire rainbow cloud' above Florida as Mother Nature puts on spectacular light show

Ken Rotberg spotted unusual phenomenon as sun dropped behind a storm cloud in the early evening

Rare sight also known as a 'circumhorizon arc'

By SHARI MILLER

PUBLISHED: 11:15, 15 August 2012 | UPDATED: 13:15, 15 August 2012

article-2188615-148DAF69000005DC-72_964x721.jpgBurning bright: The rare phenomenon appeared behind a storm cloud near Delray Beach, Florida

width=500 height=373http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/08/15/article-2188615-148DAF97000005DC-667_964x721.jpg[/img]Array of colours: The circumhorizon arc falls behind the dark storm cloud

Looking up into the night sky, a stunned photographer realised he had seen something special when he captured these amazing pictures.

What perhaps looks like a multi-coloured flying saucer is in fact a rare weather phenomenon known as a 'fire rainbow cloud'.

The series of photographs were taken by Ken Rotberg as the cloud hovered over south Florida, America.

Mr Rotberg had just returned home from a game of tennis when he saw the odd sight as the sun dropped behind a storm cloud near Delray Beach in the early evening.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2188615/Photographer-captures-rare-rainbow-cloud-Florida-Mother-Nature-puts-spectacular-light-show.html#ixzz23dI9qyYX

Not exactly Aurora ish but none the less exquisite to see, and stunningly beautiful.

We are blessed to live on this fabulous Earth of ours.

Icanseeatoms.

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Aurora season begins over Arctic

arctic_strip.jpgPosted on August 21, 2012 Posted on August 21, 2012

August 21, 2012 – SPACE - The long days of northern summer are coming to an end, and auroras are appearing in the darkening Arctic skies

http://theextinctionprotocol.wordpress.com/2012/08/21/aurora-season-begins-over-arctic/

I hope you all enjoy this years show from both Northern and Southern skies.

Love is the way forward.

Agorwch eich calon ac yn meddwl am y bydd dim ond wedyn byddwch yn gweld

Icanseeatoms.

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TWILIGHT MIX:

Sky watchers around the Arctic Circle are noticing a mix of colours at sunset that they have not seen in a while, twilight Blue plus Aurora Green. As summer comes to an end in the Northern Hemisphere and the midnight sun sets, the Northern Lights ( Aurora Borealis ) are back.

Nenne Aman sends this picture taken last " night " from the Arjeplog Lapland of Northern Sweden:

The first Auroras of the season are always something special,"says Aman." Even if its not very strong it makes the heart go wild ! Thats how it was last night"

NOAA forecasters estimate a 35% chance of more Arctic Auroras on August 26th in response to a high speed solar wind stream. " The Aurora-hunting season of 2012/13 has begun. Let the show commence.

Icanseeatoms.

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MORE STORMING

Earth's polar magnetic field remains stormy and unsettled after the CME impact of Sept. 3rd. Today began with a moderately strong (Kp=6) geomagnetic storm, which sparked bright auroras around the Arctic Circle. Jónína Óskarsdóttir sends this picture of the display from Faskrudsfjordur, Iceland:

http://spaceweather.com/

Icanseeatoms.

Moderate Geomagnetic Storm Flareup

With a solar wind near 500 km/s combined with a south tilting Bz component, Moderate (G2) geomagnetic storming did again take place at high latitudes. This secondary rise in geomagnetic could have been related to a CME from September 2nd. Below is a fantastic image submitted by Scott Brooker showing Aurora this morning over Beulah, Manitoba, Canada.

http://www.solarham.net/

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MAGNETIC UNREST:

Earth's magnetic field is still reverberating from a pair of CME impacts--a relatively strong blow on Sept 3rd followed by a lesser hit on Sept. 4th. The double strike ignited auroras around the Arctic Circle that are only slowly fading. Olivier Du Tré photographed this apparition over Red Deer, Alberta, on Sept. 5th:

http://spaceweather.com/

"For the second night this week, the Northern Lights put on an awesome show over Alberta," says Du Tré. "At one point about 65%-70% of the sky above the farmlands to the NE of Calgary were lit up. It was incredible."

NOAA forecasters estimate a 25% chance of strong polar geomagnetic storms on Sept. 6th as the reverberations continue

Ding Dong the Bell s are gonna chime

Icanseeatoms.

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Hello all,

Polar Lights: Arctic, Northern Lights, Aurora Borelalis,

Earth's polar magnetic field is settling down again, but more Arctic auroras are in the offing, especially on Sept 14-15 when a solar wind stream is expected to reach our planet. Check the gallery for latest images from around the poles.

http://spaceweather.com/

Jupiter swallows an Asteroid !!

Icanseeatoms.

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Hello all,

AUTUMN LIGHTS:

Northern autumn is only days away, and that means aurora season is underway.

[move] For reasons researchers don't fully understand, equinoxes are the best times to see Northern Lights--especially around the Arctic Circle.[/move]

Now thats a fabulous understatement if ever i have heard of one !!

Aurora tour guide Chad Blakley photographed this first sign of autumn from Abisko National Park on Sweden on Sept 14th:

"The auroras were in the sky as soon as the sun went down, and they continued to glow well into the morning," says Blakley. "It was another great night in Abisko."

More autumn lights are in the offing as three solar wind streams are expected to buffet Earth's magnetic field, one after another, between Sept. 18th and 22nd. The long-range forecast includes a 15% chance of severe geomagnetic storms around the Artic Circle.

http://spaceweather.com/

For those of you who click this link, have a look see at the incoming active solar regions also on that page.

Enjoy

Icanseeatoms.

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Hello all,

AUTUMN LIGHTS:

Marianne Bergli sends this picture of auroras shimmering directly above Storfjord, Norway:

"Last night it was difficult to select [which part of the sky to photograph]. The auroras were dancing everywhere," says Bergli. "Eventually I was just lying on my back looking up. It was absolutely, unbelievable wonderful."

Almost spooky/spirit like:

This second picture is from Frank Olsen, Sept 24 2012 @ 19.04 Sortland Norway.

Icanseeatoms.

http://spaceweather.com/

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Hello all,

Aurora season has arrived October 1st 2012.

Frank Olsen photographed this green curtain shining through bright moonlight over Sortland, Norway, on October 1st:

"Despite glaring full moonlight and heavy clouds, I managed to get some nice shots tonight," says Olsen. "As soon as the clouds cracked up, the auroras were there."

Many thanks for all who post on the Image Gallery, keep it going.

http://spaceweather.com/gallery/index.php?title=aurora&title2=lights

http://spaceweather.com/

Aurora - Aurora may be seen as low as Pennsylvania to Iowa to Oregon.

Icanseeatoms.

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Awesome pics Ican they beautiful  8)

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Hello all,

I would like to introduce you all to a Norwegian fellow by the name of Ole C. Salomonsen, a photographic artist who over a period of many days/months and miles of travel and not forgetting his time, using time lapse equipment has made so far 2 videos of the Aurora Borealis or Northern Lights of such breathtaking quality i was almost bowled over in awe.

Ole hails from Tromso, Norway

The title of the first video is: In The Land Of The Northern Lights ( Northern Norway )

He then explains:

Here is my first video project.

It is a timelapse video of the Northern Lights. All sequences are shot in or close to Tromsø in Northern Norway.

I have spent over 6months collecting footage for this, I have shot approx 50.000 stills to choose from in making this video. A goal for me has been to try to preserve the real-time speed of the northern lights, or come as close as possible, and present it the way I experienced it, instead of the northern lights just flashing over the sky in the blink of an eye. It may work on other time-lapse videos with fast moving clouds and sunsets etc, but with the northern lights in focus, it should be presented in it's true speed to reflect her beauty, imo. In the video I have put together a collection of slow moving auroras in the woods, over the mounatins, in the city, in the foreshore, reflected in the sea, with some of the most spectacular and strongest auroral outbreaks seen in many years. Included here is a coronal outbreak, in which I am particularly happy to present, since it is very difficult to get on stills, even worse on "film".

I got a fantastic soundtrack made for the video by local musical talent in Tromsø; Per Wollen. A Huge thanks goes to you Per obviously! The audio track "Aurora in the sky" can be found on iTunes.

The second video called: Celestial Lights  ( viewed from Earth )

Celestial Lights is my second video project. It is another stop motion based video about the northern lights. The video is shot in the northern parts of Norway, Finland and Sweden during autumn 2011, winter and spring 2012.

I am positive all of you viewing this thread will be astounded  by the sheer quality and presentation of Ole s work.

Happy viewing to you all.

Icanseeatoms.

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A BBC news report from October 8th 2012 in regards to the Great Aurora sightings in Scotland by way of a time lapse video:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-19883720

In the next link there are 10 still pictures of the Aurora in Scotland also from the BBC

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-19881645

Also a link from The Daily Telegraph:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/earthnews/9596474/Perfect-magnetic-storm-brings-spectacular-Northern-Lights-show.html 

Ok, and now for something a little out of the normal box:

AURORAS AND DINOFLAGELLATES:

On Oct 7th, Frank Olsen went to the beach outside Sortland, Norway to photograph the colors of aurora borealis in the sky. He also found some strange colors at his feet. The beach was aglow with bioluminescent dinoflagellates:

"I was photographing the auroras when the Noctilucales washed up on the beach," says Olsen. "The moonlight was a nice bonus."

There is an interesting link between the auroras and the dinoflagellates. Both use oxygen to create their glow. In the case of the marine organism, a chemical pigment (luciferin) reacts with oxygen to create light. Meanwhile up in the sky, charged particles from the solar wind rain down on the atmosphere, colliding with oxygen molecules to create the telltale green hue of auroras.

http://spaceweather.com/

The Dinoflagellates are in the 2nd picture:

dinoflagellate |?d??n?(?)?flad??le?t|

nounBiology

a single-celled organism with two flagella, occurring in large numbers in marine plankton and also found in fresh water. Some produce toxins that can accumulate in shellfish, resulting in poisoning when eaten.

?Division Dinophyta or class Dinophyceae, division Chromophycota (or phylum Dinophyta, kingdom Protista).

ORIGIN late 19th cent. (as an adjective): from modern Latin Dinoflagellata (plural), from Greek dinos ‘whirling’ + Latin flagellum ‘small whip’ (see flagellum) .

Noctilucales definition from Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noctilucales

I thought this was interesting the way modern science sees it !

Icanseeatoms.

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Arctic sky watchers should remain alert for Auroras this evening October 19 2012.

Also, this week end, the ORIONID Meteor Shower.

The Earth will pass through a stream of debris from Halley s Comet the source of the annual Orionid Meteor shower.

Forecasters expect +/- 25 meteors per hour when the shower peaks on Oct 21st.

Source: http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2012/12oct_orionids/

http://spaceweather.com/

Aurora pic of the week for me;

Stay Alert !

Icanseeatoms.

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TY ICSA!

These are truly stunning and beautiful pictures you've brought here....

I've only ever seen one of these in my lifetime - and the color was pink....it was over my home - and it was so beautiful, although, at the time, I had no idea what it was.

I'd love to visit Scotland (hell, I'd love to live there!) and be witness to this first hand instead of pictures.

Thanks again.  Very nice.  ;D

W2K

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Hello Whos2Know,

thank you for replying to this thread, i am really pleased you enjoyed the pictures and videos, it makes my efforts all the worthwhile.

Take a look outside when its dark preferably just before dawn if you can because thats when you will see the best of the best showing.

I can say that this evening i shall be outside early AM with my camera at the ready and also with a drinky of some description, depending on mood.

There is more to this thread than meets the eye !

Icanseeatoms.

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I have been outside before dawn - but unfortunately, I don't get to see these things where I live...I guess wrong place to live :(

If possible, take some pictures - because I really do enjoy these photos.  I have one as my computer's desktop as we type, lol.

And as for the drinky goes....don't get wonky my friend.

8)

W2K

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Hello all,

Update; 1st November 2012

http://spaceweather.com/

JUPITER AND THE MOON:

The Moon and Jupiter are in conjunction tonight, only a few degrees apart. Look for the bright pair rising in the east a few hours after sunset.

http://spaceweather.com/images2012/01nov12/skymap.gif

http://spaceweather.com/gallery/index.php?title=moon

CME IMPACT:

A coronal mass ejection hit Earth's magnetic field on Oct. 31st around 1530 UT. The impact jolted Earth's polar magnetic field and sparked auroras around the Arctic Circle. Frank Olsen sends this picture from Sortland, Norway:

For a while, the auroras were bright enough to see despite the glare of the nearly-full Moon. "Conditions were excellent for aurora photography," says Olsen. "I captured the Moon with the Pleiades on top and Jupiter to the left. And just over the mountain, Orion was rising."

NOAA forecasters estimate a 30% to 60% chance of continued geomagnetic activity around the poles during the next 24 hours as reverberations from the CME impact wane.

The picture is copyright so please click the link above or this one below.

http://spaceweather.com/gallery/index.php?title=aurora&title2=lights

As a side note; AMAZING ICE HALO DISPLAY:

On Oct. 30th, sky watchers around the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, witnessed something amazing: A complex network of luminous arcs and rings surrounded the afternoon sun. "I've never seen anything quite like it," says eyewitness Bill Cooke, head of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office. Solar physicist David Hathaway snapped this picture of the display: 

The apparition is almost certainly connected to hurricane Sandy. The core of the storm swept well north of Alabama, but Sandy's outer bands did pass over the area, leaving behind a thin haze of ice crystals in cirrus clouds. Sunlight shining through the crystals produced an unusually rich variety of ice halos.

"By my count, there are two sun dogs, a 22o halo, a parahelic circle, an upper tangent arc, and a parry arc," says Chris Brightwell, who also photographed the display. "It was amazing."

http://spaceweather.com/gallery/full_image.php?image_name=Chris-Brightwell-photo_1351634342.jpg

Update

Atmospheric optics expert Les Cowley comments on the Sandy-ice halo link: "Over the last few days there have been spectacular halo displays around the edge of Sandy from New England to Alabama. Hathaway's image like many others shows several very rare halo arcs, an upper Lowitz, helic and Parry supralateral."

It might not be necessary to wait another decade for a repeat performance. Some researchers believe that superstorms will become more common in the years ahead as a result of climate change, creating new things both terrible and beautiful to see overhead. Sky watchers in the storm zone should remain alert for the unusual

http://news.yahoo.com/scientists-look-climate-change-superstorm-223342829.html

Enjoy !

Icanseeatoms.

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Hello all,

Recent updates for the last 10 days include some more outstanding Aurora Borealis & Aurora Australis photos:

http://spaceweather.com/

The first photo was taken by Antii Pietikainen on November 7th 2012, at Muonio, Lapland, Finland.

The second was taken by Maki Yanagimachi on November 1st 2012, at Mt.John University Observatory, Lake Tekapo, New Zealand.

Also ; TOTAL ECLIPSE OF THE SUN:

[/size]Scientists and sky watchers are converging on the northeast coast of Australia, near the Great Barrier Reef, for a total eclipse of the sun on Nov. 13/14. For researchers, the brief minutes of totality open a window into some of the deepest mysteries of solar physics.

[/size]If Botanic is watching hi mate, wish i was there with you.

[/size]

[/size]Icanseeatoms.

[/size]

Whoops apologies for the code.

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Hello all,

http://spaceweather.com/

RED AURORAS:

Auroras are usually green, and sometimes purple, but seldom do sky watchers see much red. The geomagnetic storm of Nov. 13/14 was different. It produced auroras with a distinctly rosy hue. David E. Cartier, Sr. photographed the phenomenon near Marsh Lake, about 40 km east of Whitehorse in Canada's Yukon Territory:

The apparition might be related to rare all-red auroras sometimes seen during intense geomagnetic storms. They occur some 300 to 500 km above Earth's surface and are not yet fully understood. Some researchers believe the red lights are linked to a large influx of low-energy electrons. When such electrons recombine with oxygen ions in the upper atmosphere, red photons are emitted. At present, space weather forecasters cannot predict when this will occur.

Could more reds be in the offing? NOAA estimates a 30% to 35% chance of polar geoagnetic storms on Nov. 16th and 17th.

http://spaceweather.com/gallery/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=73560

Scroll down to see more pics.

http://www2.gi.alaska.edu/ScienceForum/ASF9/918.html

Here is a March 22nd 1989 document from the Alaska Science Forum, The Rare Red Aurora Article no918 by Carla Helfferich, attempting to explain the where/whys/whats of the Red Aurora.

Other documents exist up till 1999 you can find them by scrolling down to the Aurora Index.

Red Auroras eh, January 25, 1938 The Fatima Storm, http://prophecyinthemaking.blogspot.co.uk/2011/10/fatimaaurora-sign-preceding-ww3.html

I am not in anyway religious nor am i saying anything else on this text link above.

Hopi Prophecy of the Coming 5th age blue/red Star Kachinas:

I dont know You be the Judge!

Icanseeatoms.

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First-Ever Hyperspectral Images of Earth's Auroras

New Camera Provides Tantalizing Clues of New Atmospheric Phenomenon

121129111839-large.jpg?1354206287

The aurora as seen as a color composite image from the NORUSCA II camera. Three bands were combined to make the image. Each band was assigned a different color -- red, green, and blue -- to enhance the features of the aurora for analysis. (Credit: Optics Express)

"ScienceDaily (Nov. 29, 2012) — Hoping to expand our understanding of auroras and other fleeting atmospheric events, a team of space-weather researchers designed and built NORUSCA II, a new camera with unprecedented capabilities that can simultaneously image multiple spectral bands, in essence different wavelengths or colors, of light. The camera was tested at the Kjell Henriksen Observatory (KHO) in Svalbard, Norway, where it produced the first-ever hyperspectral images of auroras -- commonly referred to as "the Northern (or Southern) Lights" -- and may already have revealed a previously unknown atmospheric phenomenon."

Details on the camera and the results from its first images were published November 29 in the Optical Society's (OSA) open-access journal Optics Express.

Auroras, nature's celestial fireworks, are created when charged particles from the Sun penetrate Earth's magnetic field. These shimmering displays in the night sky reveal important information about the Earth-Sun system and the way our planet responds to powerful solar storms. Current-generation cameras, however, are simply light buckets -- meaning they collect all the light together into one image -- and lack the ability to separately capture and analyze multiple slivers of the visible spectrum. That means if researchers want to study auroras by looking at specific bands or a small portion of the spectrum they would have to use a series of filters to block out the unwanted wavelengths.

The new NORUSCA II hyperspectral camera achieves the same result without any moving parts, using its advanced optics to switch among all of its 41 separate optical bands in a matter of microseconds, orders of magnitude faster than an ordinary camera. This opens up new possibilities for discovery by combining specific bands of the same ethereal phenomenon into one image, revealing previously hidden details."

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121129111839.htm?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Fmost_popular+%28ScienceDaily%3A+Most+Popular+News%29

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Color, Color, Everywhere....enjoy....Light Pillars...Stockholm, Sweden

‘Pillars Of Light’ Or UFO Portals? Mysterious Lights Fill Stockholm SkiesDec 2, 2012

"Residents of Stockholm, Sweden looked up at the night sky Sunday night thinking they had arrived in the Arctic Circle and were witnessing the Aurora; either that or a UFO invasion. These lights were no aurora (nor UFO’s for that matter), they are known as ‘pillars of light’. According to the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, it is the light that is reflected in ice crystals that form in the air when it is cold. Similar pillars of light have also been photographed elsewhere though no signs of unidentified flying objects have accompanied them."

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"Arctic air combines with river steam and a corn milling plant’s steam to produce light pillars over Blair Nebraska, thanks to ice crystals floating in the air from the steam sources. A setting moon adds to the scene, creating a light pillar of its own."

width=500 height=332http://beforeitsnews.com/contributor/upload/5385/images/light-pillars-52.jpg[/img]

Light Pillar Pictures

Uploaded by BlueStormProduction on Jun 17, 2010

Light pillars are preety awesome

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GHOSTLY WHITE RAINBOW:

Dec. 1st was a foggy night in Little Sioux, Iowa. Nevertheless, Evan Ludes decided to go outside to photograph the nearly-full Moon (and "to play in the fog," he says). The Moon was high and bright, as expected, and when he finished snapping the lunar disk, he turned around to find this ghostly white rainbow behind his back:

lunarfogbow_strip.jpg

""It was a lunar fogbow," explains Ludes.

Fogbows are sometimes called "white rainbows," and that's about right. Both rainbows and fogbows are caused by light reflected from water droplets. When the droplets are large (rain), they act like prisms, spreading the colors wide for easy visibility. When the droplets are small (fog), the prism-action is reduced, and colors are smeared together into a ghostly-white arc.

"I also saw a fogbow created by our headlights," he adds. "It was incredibly bright visually, and this was my first time ever seeing one!"

width=500 height=333http://www.spaceweather.com/images2012/03dec12/carfogbow.jpg[/img]

http://www.spaceweather.com/

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