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breezy

uh oh....what's up???? Disappearing Water...

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The IDIOCY of peeing and crapping in potable water total lunacy !!!!!!! 

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how do you fined that china is taking 5 bladders  of water witch each hold 5 ace feet of water from canada back to china

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Tug captain quits has had enough of running aground on the once mighty Machenzie river N.W. Territories canada. Now the athabasca in alberta is so low you can ground a canoe this river once had barge traffic, so you see north america is low on water!! 

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On the one hand

SAN FRANCISCO — California oil producers used 214 acre-feet of water, equivalent to nearly 70 million gallons, in the process of fracking for oil and gas in the state last year, less than previously projected, state officials told Reuters.

http://powersource.post-gazette.com/powersource/companies-powersource/2015/04/04/California-used-70-million-gallons-of-water-in-fracking-in-2014/stories/201504040036

and no on the other hand…

While it’s not clear where the 2 million gallon figure above comes from, Reuters recently reported that California oil companies used “214 acre-feet of water, equivalent to nearly 70 million gallons, in the process of fracking for oil and gas in the state last year, less than previously projected.” The story, which cited “state officials” for the figure, was widely read, and the factoid ended up in viral images like this one.

Seventy million gallons may sound like a large number. But in the context of California’s drought, it’s not. In December, NASA noted that it would take 11 trillion gallons to end the drought.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2015/04/13/what-environmentalists-get-wrong-when-they-use-the-california-drought-to-attack-fracking/

At any rate, however "small 70 million gallons of water" is, it shouldn’t be used for fracking – no FRACKING way.

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Shrinking Colorado River is a growing concern for Yuma farmers — and millions of water users

William Yardley

July 18, 2015

"The Colorado River begins as snowmelt in the Rocky Mountains and ends 1,450 miles south in Mexico after making a final sacrifice to the United States: water for the farm fields in this powerhouse of American produce.

Throughout the winter, perfect heads of romaine, red-and-green lettuce, spinach and broccoli are whisked from the warm desert soil here onto refrigerated trucks that deliver them to grocery stores across the continent. If you eat a green salad between Thanksgiving and April, whether in Minnesota, Montreal or Modesto, odds are good that some of it was grown in or around Yuma.

The summer freshness on all of those winter plates reflects the marvel of engineering the Colorado has become — and why managing the river in the Southwest's changing landscape seems so daunting."

post-5-0-96452000-1437329393_thumb.jpg

snip

http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-sej-colorado-river-arizona-20150719-story.html#page=1

notice that Mexico's claim to Colorado River water is not mentioned on the above graphic

 

 

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Meanwhile Lake Poopo, the second largest lake of Bolivia, has almost completely disappeared

December 14, 2015

 

"Considered as the second largest lake of Bolivia, after Lake Titicaca, Poopó has virtually disappeared. This lake, formerly home of multitude of endemic species, is now dry and full of dead fish and animals.

This video features the disappearance of Lake Poopo in Bolivia:

 

 

El Lago Poopó desaparece (Bolivia)

 

 

 

lake-poopo-disappears-bolivia.jpg

 

The lake, which some years ago was a source of income for many fishing families in the region has dried up into a vast salt desert."

snip  more pics/video at link

http://strangesounds.org/2015/12/second-largest-lake-of-bolivia-lake-poopo-has-almost-completely-disappeared.html

 

Tx Landdownunder

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Meanwhile Lake Poopo, the second largest lake of Bolivia, has almost completely disappeared

December 14, 2015

 

"Considered as the second largest lake of Bolivia, after Lake Titicaca, Poopó has virtually disappeared.

This lake, formerly home of multitude of endemic species, is now dry and full of dead fish and animals.

This video features the disappearance of Lake Poopo in Bolivia:[/size]

 

 

El Lago Poopó desaparece (Bolivia)

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UiT3kcJgJ28

 

 

lake-poopo-disappears-bolivia.jpg

 

The lake, which some years ago was a source of income for many fishing families in the region has dried up into a vast salt desert."[/size]

snip  more pics/video at link[/size]

http://strangesounds.org/2015/12/second-largest-lake-of-bolivia-lake-poopo-has-almost-completely-disappeared.html

 

Tx Landdownunder

Kind of crazy to see so many places breezy drying up. I have actually noticed around me the grass is doimg something I have never seen before and the smell of sulfur and poignant gas at times is occurring. The grass itself is turning an almost white color. Very strange and it's spreading. Maybe due to the earth shifting or possible major earthquake ready to occur?

Things are changing way more rapidly as we approach the new era of this shift and new year.

Have a wonderful evening,

Namaste,

12:12

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Methane and sulphur?  Not good 12:12!  I won't ask your location, but I hope you have no nuclear facilities near you.  This is the same thing going on in So. California and in Japan.

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Methane and sulphur?  Not good 12:12!  I won't ask your location, but I hope you have no nuclear facilities near you.  This is the same thing going on in So. California and in Japan.

It's becoming more widespread and stronger at times. The grass is definitely spreading too. We do have nuclear sites near us; not a good recipe if something of a natural occurrence did occur. These fault zones are becoming more and more auspicious to awakening I believe soon.

Hope you and yours is having a very good week and everyone of your loved ones is healthy and happy.

Namaste

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4 Billion People at Risk as 'Water Table Dropping All Over the World'

February 12, 2016

Andreas Germanos

 

 

Global scarcity of key life source far worse than thought, new study finds

 

crackedearth.jpg?itok=oBQ9YiDG

 

"Water scarcity has become a global problem affecting us all," stated study co-author Arjen Hoekstra. (Photo: Oxfam International/cc/flickr)

 

"A new analysis reveals that global water scarcity is a far greater problem than previously thought, affecting 4 billion people—two-thirds of the world's population—and will be "one of the most difficult and important challenges of this century."

 
Previous analyses looked at water scarcity at an annual scale, and had found that water scarcity affected between 1.7 and 3.1 billion people. The new study, published Friday in the journal Science Advances, assessed water scarcity on a monthly basis, more fully capturing the specific times of year when it could be an issue.
 
"Water scarcity has become a global problem affecting us all," stated study co-author Arjen Hoekstra, a professor of water management at the University of Twente in the Netherlands.
 
The study found that almost half of the 4 billion affected by severe water scarcity for a month or more are in India and China. Millions of others affected live in Bangladesh, Nigeria, Pakistan, and Mexico.
 
The United States is far from immune to the problem, with 130 million people affected by water scarcity for at least one month a year, mostly in the states of Texas, California, and Florida. And among the rivers the study notes that are fully or nearly depleted before reaching their end is the Colorado River in the West.
 
There are also half a billion people who face severe water scarcity year round, the analysis found."
snip
 
Tx Reddwolf
 
I cannot forget Acolyte saying, many years ago, that "Water is the key", he is proven more correct, each and every day.
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Quake dries up centuries-old Kumamoto water source

April 30, 2016

Asahi Shimbun

 

 

post-5-0-50105300-1462060152_thumb.jpg

 

"MINAMI-ASO, Kumamoto Prefecture--For hundreds of years, the sacred Shioisha spring here has provided water for drinking and irrigation in this village in the shadow of Mount Aso.

 
But the fountainhead, which gushed about five tons of spring water a minute, has dried up since the magnitude-7.3 earthquake struck the prefecture early on April 16. Its disappearance has local residents baffled.
 
“I was absolutely flabbergasted to hear that Shioisha spring has dried up. It turns my world upside down,” said 95-year-old Natsuko Goto, who was taking shelter at an elementary school after the earthquake. “What will happen now?”
 
Shioisha spring is located on the premises of Shioijinja shrine.
 
According to Sachio Hirose, the 63-year-old parish representative, there are many fountainhead springs in Minami-Aso, which has been dubbed “the village where water is born.” However, Shioisha spring is the one that has been worshipped by local residents as the sacred spring where the "god of water" dwells.
 
Its abundant waters have been a blessing for local rice farmers.
 
Every year, the planting of rice seedlings starts at the beginning of May in Minami-Aso, but at the moment, there is no water to irrigate the rice paddies, casting a dark shadow over the village and its agricultural production."
snip
 
Tx Landdownunder
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Desaparece el Agua del Lago Riesco en Puerto Aysén Chile | Mayo - Junio 2016.

 

 

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Facing historically low levels, Lake Mead officials are fending off a water war. Here's how

July 6, 2016

William Yardley

 

 

"Tis may be what the start of a water war looks like.

 
Drought is draining the West’s largest reservoir, Lake Mead, to historic low levels. Forecasts say climate change will make things worse. Headlines warn of water shortages and cutbacks. Members of Congress are moving to protect their states’ supplies.
 
Yet if war is really imminent, why is one of the region’s most experienced water managers doing the same thing he has done for years: tinkering?
 
“I like to describe this as another incremental step,” said Tom Buschatzke, director of the Arizona Department of Water Resources.
 
Buschatzke was talking about a plan he is helping develop, along with water managers in California, Nevada and Mexico, that would voluntarily reduce water allocations from the Colorado River to those three states and Mexico. They hope to have it in place in time to avoid steeper, mandatory cuts that could begin as soon as 2018.
 
Would their plan change everything? Would it finally fix the increasingly inadequate blend of canals, conservation and compromises that somehow keeps water flowing to more than 25 million people, including a substantial chunk of those in Southern California?
 
Not even close.
 
But for Buschatzke, who has spent decades efficiently providing water for a desert population — Arizona uses less water now than it did 60 years ago even though the population has soared from 1.1 million to 6.7 million — the big fix is actually in the accumulation of all the little fixes he and others are constantly making. A federal grant for new technology that will better measure water use. Paying a farmer to fallow a field. Saying nice things about your colleagues across the state line and the fine folks in Washington. Keeping things collegial. Sharing. Saving. Preserving the process — and the peace.
 
“I don’t think a water war is inevitable,” he said. “I think we’ve proven over the last 20 years that we can effectively work together to find solutions that really work. And as long as we continue to do that, the water war won’t happen.”
 
The current project, called the drought contingency plan, is a tweak to a previous tweak. Nearly a decade ago, water managers recognized that Lake Mead was draining faster than predicted. They recalibrated plans for how they could handle cutbacks. Now, with Lake Mead dropping even faster, they are recalibrating again."
 
post-5-0-43810000-1468215258_thumb.jpg

The water level in Lead Mead and against the Hoover Dam shows a "bath tub ring" on Oct. 15, 2015. (Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times)

snip

http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-sej-colorado-river-20160703-snap-story.html

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Beached boats, pink water as drought depletes Utah's Great Salt Lake

Sept. 22, 2016

 

post-5-0-16591800-1474776796_thumb.jpg

 

"SALT LAKE CITY -- On the southern shore of Utah’s Great Salt Lake, more than 100 boats are sitting high and dry in a parking lot, unable to sail the shallow, drought-stricken sea.

 
North of the nearly empty marina, salt-loving bacteria thriving in the low water has turned the liquid pink.
 
The massive lake, key to the state’s economy and identity, is skirting record low levels after years of below-average precipitation and record heat. A few dozen lawmakers are taking a road trip Thursday and Friday to see the problems firsthand and learn what they can do to help -- besides praying for more rain and snow this winter.
 
State officials said in July, that the lake is at its lowest level since the 1960s, before the causeway was in place, CBS affiliate KUTV reported.   
 
The lake, about 75 miles long and 30 miles wide, is America’s largest outside the Great Lakes. Water levels have always fluctuated, but they have been dropping steadily since 2011.
 
“If this continues ... the ecosystem as a whole is under a pretty significant threat,” said Jason Curry, a spokesman for Utah’s Division of Forestry, Fire and State Lands.
 
The state estimates that the Great Salt Lake’s ecosystem has a $1.32 billion economic effect. It is a home or major resting place for more than 250 species of birds. Salt and other minerals are mined from the lake and used for fertilizer, melting snow on roadways and other products. Its waters are credited with helping produce dry, powdery snow that attracts skiers worldwide to the nearby mountains."
snip
 

 

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If you read what this company actually extracts from each water company they buy it accounts for many losses as well as the frackers who attach often to water supply via underground connections avoiding having to pay for it.... after all they are miners 

 

Nestle out bids another town to gain control of local water supply

 

http://www.commondreams.org/news/2016/09/23/travesty-nestle-outbids-another-town-control-local-water-supply?utm_campaign=shareaholic&utm_medium=facebook&utm_source=socialnetwork

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Where is the Mississippi River water going? | Going DRY not long after historic floods

 

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On 10/3/2017 at 1:40 PM, breezy said:

Where is the Mississippi River water going? | Going DRY not long after historic floods

 

 

If the floods washed away the various barriers and sandbars...  the water would flow faster, maybe even have a deeper channel..

 

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More water disappearing - PA lake goes bone dry in 48 hours - Local man mystified!

 

 

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This disappearing water is becoming a really strange event to watch.  Fascinating and hard to work out the actual cause with this.

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But he's a tad off, Pa., is not near the New Madrid, several states away actually.  What I wonder most, is fracking having anything to do with it?

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According to RHW, "they" are after HYDROGEN....

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