breezy

DROUGHTS and DUST STORMS

90 posts in this topic

50 million gallons of water lost after California dam vandalized: newspaper

May 23, 2015   

 

 

"SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Some 50 million gallons of water were lost after an act of vandalism damaged an inflatable dam near San Francisco, the local Oakland Tribune newspaper reported on Friday.

The loss comes as the state is in its fourth year of a devastating drought that has prompted Governor Jerry Brown to impose the state's first-ever mandatory cutbacks in urban water use, up to 36 percent in some communities.

Alameda County Water District officials told the newspaper that the agency reported the incident, which caused the water to run into the San Francisco Bay, to police around 11:30 a.m. on Thursday.

"This is a very significant loss of water under any circumstances, and more so in the drought conditions we are experiencing," water district general manager Robert Shaver told the newspaper. "It is an utterly senseless, destructive and wasteful thing to do."

snip

http://news.yahoo.com/50-million-gallons-water-lost-california-dam-vandalized-065653622--sector.html?.gg_invalid=true

 

I wonder if it's possible that this bladder that held the water in, may have deteriorated and broken by itself? Wouldn't it appear like a cut if it had split? Kind of like a balloon, when it pops, it breaks in a straight tear line.  With that fence and barbed wire, someone would had to have been very determined. Then, if that thing needed replaced and they didn't, well sabotage works as an excuse.  

Tx Reddwolf

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Sandstorm plaguing Israel is worst in country’s history

 

The dense sandstorm that has blanketed Israel with thick yellowish-brown dust in recent days is the worst that the Jewish state has ever endured, the Environmental Protection Ministry said Friday.

 

According to the ministry, the current storm, which began Tuesday, and the one experienced in February of this year have seen the highest concentration of dust particles in the air since the creation of the state in 1948, Channel 10 reported.

 

The storm is expected to continue throughout the weekend and begin dissipating Sunday.

A sharp rise in temperature on Wednesday added to the already difficult weather conditions, and forecasters on Thursday predicted that the dust, heatwave and high humidity would only taper off Saturday evening.

By its second day, the massive sandstorm broke both electricity usage and air pollution records across the country.

 

http://www.timesofisrael.com/sandstorm-plaguing-israel-is-worst-in-countrys-history/

post-12-0-61018500-1442019738_thumb.png

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This is what I started to post the day we went down, and notice that a year ago, Reddwolf posted an article about Brazil and fighting over puddles.

 

Brazil, land of water, goes thirsty

Sebastian Smith

October 30, 2015

 

Part-MVD-Mvd6723059-1-1-0.jpg

 

A stranded amphibious aircraft is seen next to a hangar on the bed of the Aleixo Lake, in the rural area of Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil, on October 23, 2015 (AFP Photo/Raphael Alves)

 

"Duque de Caxias (Brazil) (AFP) - The sign -- "risk of drowning" -- outside one of Rio de Janeiro's freshwater reservoirs looks like a joke: there's no water here left to drown in.

 

Instead, the Saracuruna reservoir near Duque de Caxias, outside Rio, is an expanse of sand, mud and vegetation. Four stray dogs scamper and cattle come to drink from a stream still running through the middle.

 

"It's been a long time since there was any water here," said a security guard walking up the dry bed to order AFP journalists away on Friday.

 

The scene at Saracuruna is repeated across much of eastern Brazil between Rio and the megacity of Sao Paulo, with reservoirs and rivers running dry and authorities scrambling to avoid having to impose rationing.

 

Rio de Janeiro state's environmental department blames "the worst drought in 85 years" for the crisis, while independent activists say decades of bad policy is equally culpable."

snip

- Crisis? No, it's worse -

The idea of drought in Brazil might sound ridiculous.

 

Latin America's biggest country is one of the world's great sources for fresh water, accounting for about 12 percent of supplies.

 

However, much of that water is locked into the mighty Amazon river in the north, of little use to greater Sao Paulo's 20 million and Rio de Janeiro's approximately 10 million people.

 

And even without the current drought, environmental experts say, government mismanagement has been enough to bring Brazil to the brink of disaster.

 

"It's much more serious than a crisis. A crisis is something that ends eventually, but this is structural," said Rio-based environmentalist Sergio Ricardo.

 

"You have a prolonged lack of rainfall but also prolonged bad management that has left Rio completely vulnerable."

snip

http://news.yahoo.com/brazil-land-water-goes-thirsty-035910463.html

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Damage from sinking land costing California billions

December 27, 2015

Scott Smith

putting this here because it is due to the drought, not actually a sink hole, but without the water, the land will sink/shrink

pictures are AP 

 

 

"DOS PALOS, Calif. (AP) — A canal that delivers vital water supplies from Northern California to Southern California is sinking in places. So are stretches of a riverbed undergoing historic restoration. On farms, well casings pop up like mushrooms as the ground around them drops.

 

Four years of drought and heavy reliance on pumping of groundwater have made the land sink faster than ever up and down the Central Valley, requiring repairs to infrastructure that experts say are costing billions of dollars.

This slow-motion land subsidence — more than one foot a year in some places — is not expected to stop anytime soon, experts say, nor will the expensive repairs.

"It's shocking how a huge area is affected, but how little you can tell with your eye," said James Borchers, a hydro-geologist, who studies subsidence and says careful monitoring is necessary to detect and address sinking before it can do major damage to costly infrastructure such as bridges and pipelines.

Land subsidence is largely the result of pumping water from the ground. As aquifers are depleted, the ground sags.

The most severe examples today are in San Joaquin Valley, where the U.S. Geological Survey in 1975 said half of the land is prone to sinking. USGS researchers later called it one of the "single largest alterations of the land surface attributed to humankind."

snip

http://news.yahoo.com/damage-sinking-land-costing-california-billions-152206851.html

Tx Reddwolf

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Damage from sinking land costing California billions

December 27, 2015

Scott Smith

putting this here because it is due to the drought, not actually a sink hole, but without the water, the land will sink/shrink

pictures are AP 

 

 

"DOS PALOS, Calif. (AP) — A canal that delivers vital water supplies from Northern California to Southern California is sinking in places. So are stretches of a riverbed undergoing historic restoration. On farms, well casings pop up like mushrooms as the ground around them drops.[/size]

 

Four years of drought and heavy reliance on pumping of groundwater have made the land sink faster than ever up and down the Central Valley, requiring repairs to infrastructure that experts say are costing billions of dollars.

This slow-motion land subsidence — more than one foot a year in some places — is not expected to stop anytime soon, experts say, nor will the expensive repairs.

"It's shocking how a huge area is affected, but how little you can tell with your eye," said James Borchers, a hydro-geologist, who studies subsidence and says careful monitoring is necessary to detect and address sinking before it can do major damage to costly infrastructure such as bridges and pipelines.

Land subsidence is largely the result of pumping water from the ground. As aquifers are depleted, the ground sags.

The most severe examples today are in San Joaquin Valley, where the U.S. Geological Survey in 1975 said half of the land is prone to sinking. USGS researchers later called it one of the "single largest alterations of the land surface attributed to humankind."

snip

http://news.yahoo.com/damage-sinking-land-costing-california-billions-152206851.html

Tx Reddwolf

Breezy, so is south Florida. In fact the latest analysis is within three to five years the southern tip of Florida will be underwater.

The process is slowly taken shape ever changing our landscape of nature and ourselves daily. That rapid opening is expressing what if anything we can do but just be amazed how much this change is bringing forth into our daily lives.

Stay safe and keep smiling. Everyone is being affected now.

Namaste

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Persistent Drought Threatens South Africa's Food Supplies

January 8, 2016

Elena Ugrin

 

 

south_africa_feat.png

 

"Record high temperatures were recorded in Johannesburg, South Africa on January 7, 2016. The region has been facing persistent drought conditions and related food shortage since December 2015 when the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) issued an alert on the matter.

Johannesburg, Africa's largest maize producer, has been hit by several heatwaves during last year. A record breaking temperature of 38 °C (100.4 °F) was reported on January 6. The previous temperature record of 36.5 °C (97.7 °F) in the area was reported in November 2015, according to the South African Weather Service.

A new high-temperature record of 42.5 °C (108.5 °F) replaced an old one of 41 °C (105.8 °F) in the capital of Pretoria.

The latest heatwave in South Africa has been forecast to last until January 8. The drought conditions are regarded as the worst in the last 30 years, and will likely force the country to import 5 million tones of maize in 2016, which is capable of meeting only half of the region's requirements, according to the country's largest producer group.

The drought is thought to be enhanced by the strong El Niño weather phenomenon: "The presence of a strong El Nino episode in 2015/16 raises serious concerns regarding the impact on food insecurity," the FAO stated in the alert, issued on December 22, 2015.

Drought conditions in the last season have also made a significant impact of the regional harvest, according to FAO: "In 2015 maize production, accounting for nearly 80 percent of the total cereal output, declined by 27 percent on account of adverse weather."

"The steep contraction has resulted in a tight supply situation in the 2015/16 marketing year (generally May/April) and raised import requirements for most countries."

In December 2015, the South African Weather Service announced the higher than usual temperatures trend and below average rainfall levels will continue into the autumn season in May 2016."

http://thewatchers.adorraeli.com/2016/01/08/persistent-drought-threatens-south-africa-s-food-supplies/

 

 

Currently there are droughts just about everywhere ie: Cuba, Haiti, Guatemala, Mexico, S. Mexico, US West, Texas, and Europe.  With snow pack in Sierra Nevada the lowest in 500 years.

http://thewatchers.adorraeli.com

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 I have just emptied 5 inches of rain from my gauge!   Most of it fell last night.. some from yesterday and the day before.   Some surface flooding, but the streams are going down.  I will have to go up and fix my water intake once it stops raging.  Meanwhile we are on a backup tank.

 

  I'm sure a lot of places in the USA West would have liked that....  It is still VERY mild for mid winter here.  Crazy .. but good....

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LOL  yes the southern west  but shhhh, don't mention that word to me in the PNW  LOL

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102 million dead California trees 'unprecedented in our modern history,' officials say

 Nov. 18, 2016           Matt Stevens

Trees dying in drought

the video says this was taken near Placerville

"The number of dead trees in California’s drought-stricken forests has risen dramatically to more than 102 million in what officials described as an unparalleled ecological disaster that heightens the danger of massive wildfires and damaging erosion.

Officials said they were alarmed by the increase in dead trees, which they estimated to have risen by 36 million since the government’s last survey in May. The U.S. Forest Service, which performs such surveys of forest land, said Friday that 62 million trees have died this year alone.

“The scale of die-off in California is unprecedented in our modern history,” said Randy Moore, the forester for the region of the U.S. Forest Service that includes California. Trees are dying “at a rate much quicker than we thought.”

Scientists say five years of drought are to blame for much of the destruction. The lack of rain has put California’s trees under considerable stress, making them more susceptible to the organisms, such as beetles, that can kill them.  Unusually high temperatures have added to the trees’ demand for water, exacerbating an already grim situation.

The majority of the dead trees are in the southern and central Sierra Nevada region, officials said, though they warned that high mortality levels are also creeping into forests in Northern California, notably Siskiyou, Modoc, Plumas and Lassen counties. 

Adrian Das, an ecologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, needs only to step outside his office in Sequoia National Park to see the extent of the damage. 

“You look across the hillside on a side of the road, and you see a vast landscape of dead trees,” he said. “It’s pretty startling.”

Das said the parts of the forest at lower elevations — about 5,000 to 6,000 feet — continue to get hit the hardest. In the higher elevations, it can sometimes appear as if there is no drought and the trees are much healthier. 

“We have sugar pines here — grand trees that can live for 500 years,” he said. “Everywhere you walk, through certain parts of these forests, at least half of these big guys are dead.” 

snip  video and picture gallery at link  <<<scary and sad, as we need those trees

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-dead-trees-20161118-story.html

 

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India dust storms: More than 100 killed in Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan

May 3, 2018

snip video

"At least 109 people have been killed and scores more injured in fierce dust storms that hit the northern Indian states of Uttar Pradesh and Rajasthan.

The storms on Wednesday disrupted electricity, uprooted trees, destroyed houses and killed livestock.

Many of the dead were sleeping when their houses collapsed after being struck by intense bursts of lightning.

Dust storms are common in this part of India during summer but loss of life on this scale is unusual.

At least 73 people died in Uttar Pradesh - more than half of them of them in Agra district, which is home to the Taj Mahal monument.

Officials say the death toll could increase further.

Falling trees and walls killed many people in the state.

Local journalist Laxmikant Pachouri told the BBC that 21 people had died in the village of Kheragarh, about 50km (30 miles) south-west of Agra."
snip

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-43987209

 

 

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Experts: 'Alarming' drought conditions hit US Southwest

Susan Montoya Bryan    May 23, 2018

snip   image

"ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Rivers and watering holes are drying up, popular mountain recreation spots are closing and water restrictions are in full swing as a persistent drought intensifies its grip on pockets of the American Southwest.

Climatologists and other experts on Wednesday provided an update on the situation in the Four Corners region — where Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado and Utah meet. They say the area is among the hardest hit and there's little relief expected, and even robust summer rains might not be enough to replenish the soil and ease the fire danger.

The region is dealing with exceptional drought — the worst category. That has left farmers, ranchers and water planners bracing for a much different situation than just a year ago when only a fraction of the region was experiencing low levels of dryness.

Brian Fuchs, a climatologist with the National Drought Mitigation Center in Nebraska, said people are become more aware and more concerned."

snip

https://www.kob.com/news/drought-on-tap-to-intensify-over-us-southwest/4918667/?cat=642

This doesn't just effect the SW US.  It also affects Mexico, as they have "rights" to a certain amount of water from the Colorado river every year.  

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There's been many serious dust storms all over the world.  India, Arizona, Texas, Africa.  What keeps hitting me, is crop production and how it's affected by drought.  In the below video, at 5:45 in, he talks about a particular dust cloud from the Sahara, showing up in the western hemisphere.  

Nobody knew there was THIS much! - Now covers MOST of the Western Hemisphere

 

 

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Wall of dust, powerful monsoon storms slam Phoenix area

July 10, 2018

snip - video

"PHOENIX -- A wall of dust enveloped the Phoenix metro area, turning daylight into darkness for more than an hour Monday, as a monsoon storm packing thunder and lightning, high winds and sheets of rain grounded flights and damaged property. CBS News affiliate 3TV/CBS 5 (AZFamily.com) said officials at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport cancelled about 12 flights and delayed dozens more as the storm blew in."

snip

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/phoenix-arizona-monsoon-dust-storm-flights-cancelled-power-out-mesa/

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"Titanic" Dust Storm to fill ENTIRE Gulf of Mexico - "Sands of the Sahara"

 

 

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